#BGB Tutorial- Writing Content that Converts

by Steven A. · 57 comments

Content that Converts

This guest post is brought to you by Steven. 

Since we’ve been talking writing and content the past week or two, I thought we’d continue the trend.

Steven shares with you some of his tips for writing shiznet that converts.

Converts to what you ask? Chocolate! Vodka! Wine! (OK, OK… just kidding.)

Converts as in achieves the goal you set for it. Duh. 

Ideally those goals mean clients and sales.

Without further ado…

Blogs have many purposes.

We may claim we use blogs to facilitate communication with customers, build trust, educate readers, or let visitors know the person behind the brand.

However, at the end of the day, none of those things will sign the paychecks.  We may seem greedy and self-centered to point this out, but most of us really use blogs to convert readers into customers.

In order to do that, you must have quality content.  In fact, the only way to facilitate that conversion is with good content.  You might be wondering what the difference is between good and bad content.

Let us tell you: 

Good Content

Good content will educate, encourage, and motivate.  It will provoke thought and action.  A good copywriter will provide concise, memorable, convincing content that will engage readers.  The outcome will produce favorable results for both readers and bloggers.

Bad Content

Bad content is unclear, confusing, boring, and unrelated to the readers’ needs.  Not only will it fail to engage the reader at the point of consumption, bad content will make it even more difficult to entice the reader in the future.

Difficult to understand content that doesn’t enhance the readers’ experience will produce undesirable results for both readers and bloggers.

Is your blog full of bad content or good content?  Do you convert readers into customers?  If not, would you like to?

Here are five ways to turn bad content into good content.  Use effective copywriting to convert your visitors into loyal, paying customers.

Don’t Be Misleading

Studies show most viewers only bother to read the headlines.  Therefore, it is safe to assume a boring headline won’t entice readers to actually check out the article content at all.

As a result, many blog writers have embraced the importance of writing eye-catching, enticing headlines.  However, you can’t write headlines for the sole purpose of grabbing readers’ attention.  If you fail to deliver on your bold pronouncements, you will definitely harm the reader-to-customer conversion process.

If the headline claims you have knowledge of the best weight loss app for an iPhone, the copywriter had best include the who, what, where, when, and why of that app!  If your article’s content doesn’t deliver on the headline’s promise, readers will feel they have been tricked.

Be Thorough

I can’t tell you how many times I’ve noticed a headline that promised the world.  Then, upon opening the article, I find a measly 300 word article that doesn’t even manage to scratch the surface of what the headline promised.

Addressing what the headline proclaimed is only half the battle.  You must totally and completely address the issue.  Readers should feel you’ve left no stone uncovered.

Very rarely can that be done in 300 words, a three-point list, or with two tips.  Take the time, words and effort to really cover all aspects of the topic at hand.

However, you don’t need to write a novel.  Don’t ramble.  Cover the topic and move on.

Be Easily Understood

As a blog writer, it is not your job to impress the reader with flashy word choices, an abundance of adjectives, and tons of technical jargon.

It is your job to be relatable, understandable, and informative.  Get to the point of the article without being redundant or overly expansive.  Be as concise as possible.

Consider author George Orwell’s rules for writers…

  1.  Never use a metaphor, simile, or other figure of speech which you are used to seeing in print.
  2. Never use a long word where a short one will do.
  3. If it is possible to cut a word out, always cut it out.
  4. Never use the passive where you can use the active.
  5. Never use a foreign phrase, a scientific word, or a jargon word if you can think of an everyday English equivalent.

Don’t Forget The Purpose Of Your Blog

Yes, the primary focus of your blog should be providing quality content.  But, when possible, you should provide quality content that relates to the products and services you offer.

Ultimately, the purpose of your blog is to motivate readers to buy what you are offering.  Be reader friendly, yet convincingly persuasive.  Explain in plain English what you are offering and why the readers need it.

…But Don’t Be Obnoxious About Your Sales Pitch

Don’t go on and on about how great your business is, how wonderful you are, or how many awards you products have received.  Your all-about-me attitude will definitely be a turn off.

Instead, make your content all about the readers.  Tell how your wonderful products will make their life better.

Create meaningful content.  Discuss informative topics in a fresh, interesting manner.  Replace bad content with good content.

Meet your readers’ needs and you’ll have a much better chance of transitioning them to customers.

Over to You

Do you utilize any of these rules when writing for your blog? Do you consider your content good? Could it be better? Does it turn your readers into customers and fans? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

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