Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best

by Cori Padgett-Bukowski · 258 comments

Entrepreneur Wisdom
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Whew!  It’s finally done!  The big masterpiece I’ve been working on for two weeks. lol  I decided to go with one massive post, with the option to download the post as a PDF rather than break it up into a series… that way ya’ll can get the full monty right away rather than waiting over several days.

Quick background- I decided to put this post together because of some things I’ve been going through myself in my life and business… and it occurred to me that if I am having these sorts of struggles, it’s a sure bet many of you have your own version of them as as well.  So… this blog post was born.  MANY, MANY thanks to all the wonderful entrepreneurs who contributed their wisdom and insight in order to make this post great.

Below you’ll find a brief 3 question interview of 60 61 entrepreneurs with widely varying businesses and tastes, yet funnily enough very similar view points overall.  Interviews are in no particular order, it’s pretty much based on who got back to me when!  lol  But make sure you read every one, they are both informative and inspiring.

And if you prefer to print long posts out to read, here and again at the bottom of the post you can download a PDF version. (Right-click then save as.) You are free to share this PDF with those you feel it might benefit… however please don’t change anything in it.  And as always, be sure to share your thoughts in the comment section below, I’d love to hear them!

Edit: This post has been updated to include an interview from Mr. Problogger himself.  If you want to know what happened, you can read Why I’m a DORK and Darren Please Don’t Hate Me!

Yanik- InternetLifeStyle.com @yaniksilver

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Yanik’s friends were rolling on the floor laughing when he told them he was going to put up a web site. And they had every right to be amused since he had absolutely no web site design skills, zero HTML or coding knowledge… in fact, not much computer “know-how” whatsoever (still doesn’t).
From www.internetlifestyle.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

It’s simply to do at least one proactive activity each day to move your business forward. No matter how small, just make sure you don’t go to bed without one thing that can make tomorrow bigger than today. The other thing (I know you only asked for one but what the hell) is look at yourself as making progress not perfection. I tell new entrepreneurs all the time, “It’s about the process not the profits” at the beginning.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

All of this doesn’t really become real until the first time you get someone to give you their money in exchange for your product or service. When you see that first email notification or commission notice, it becomes real. You can watch, read, listen to all the info – but you’ve got to feel it in your gut. And it can happen sooner than later if you focus on getting something out (and realizing it’s not going to be perfect).

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Definitely the freedom and the opportunity to live life on my own terms.

David- DavidRisley.com @DavidRisley

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DavidRisley.com is properly entitled “Confessions of a Six Figure Blogger”. I have been making my living entirely on the Internet for many years now.
From www.davidrisley.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

First of all, I would question the concept of “mind-numbing adversity”. Ask yourself – where is the adversity coming from? For many entrepreneurs, it is coming from within. The simple answer, then, would be to stop getting in your own way. Realizing that that probably isn’t helpful for too many people, then it comes down to issues like self-doubt or overwhelm.

In this case, I usually recommend to break what you do down into smaller steps. Break down your goals, break down your tasks… make each one something that you can wrap your head around and accomplish in a finite amount of time. Then, do it. By doing it this way, you get a series of smaller steps accomplished… smaller successes.

That turns into a pattern that will add up to something big. Lastly, if the adversity is coming from the outside, then handle it or make it go away. Just take control.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I spend more time looking outward than looking inward. It is hard to see the road ahead if you’re too busy thinking about what’s going on behind the eyes. Take action, stop thinking. Within reason, of course. ;-)

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

For me, it is also about personal freedom and not having to answer to anybody. It is also about security, because the only security you have is provided by your own ability. The idea of security in a 9-5 job is a myth. It doesn’t exist. Just look at all the people out of work today. Wait until the dollar’s value becomes less and then see what kind of value your retirement plan really has. The only REAL security is in personal ability and self-confidence.

Catherine- BeAwesomeOnline.com @CatherineCaine

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Catherine believes that websites don’t really run on technology, they run on emotions. If you agree, then she wants to help you rock it out and be awesome online.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

There are so many tasks that you COULD be doing to build your business/website that it’s perfectly reasonable to only do the ones you enjoy. Especially in the first three to six months, when the initial excitement has worn off but the rewards aren’t coming in yet. Also, have rewards that aren’t related to money. I got through the Dip by encouraging comments – the warm fuzzy “They like me! They really, really like me! I’m really helping people!” was such a rush it didn’t matter that I’d only made $92.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Just one? Probably the biggest was that I was a serial hobbyist. I’d get fanatically interested in a subject, spend money and time on it, thinking, “This is the one, baybee,” and then after about four months the honeymoon was over and I’d abandon it. It was hard for me to push through that and believe I could keep going for the long haul, keep meeting my commitments and not just fade away. It turned out to be startlingly easy once I dug in.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

My work matters. I liked my Day Job and the people, but nothing I did was really important, long-term. Now, I’m changing people’s websites and lives! Every single day I’m doing work that means something, that lasts. It’s awesome.

Joella- BlogsWithWings.com @BlogsWithWings

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Blog Angel A.K.A. Joella Molson is a passionate: blogger, graphic designer, blog template designer, gardener, crafter, cook, CSI fan (all of them), Stargate fan (all flavors), Sci-Fi buff, mother (girl & boy all grown up), pet owner (2 cats, 2 dogs) and passionate mate to Steve. The love of her life.
From blogswithwings.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Embarking on the journey to entrepreneurial freedom is usually not easy. And once you get moving, it may seem as though you spend a great deal of time spinning your wheels. There are things you can do to make it easier to deal with adversity and setbacks:

1. Surrounding yourself with people who believe in you. I’m talking about the kind of people who will be there to give you a pat on the back or a kick in the butt, whatever you it is you need to keep going.

2. Give yourself permission to fail. Failure is not a bad thing, honest. It’s just a part of discovering what works and what doesn’t. Welcome failure as a part of the learning experience. Let it help you grow and get creative about accomplishing your goals.

3. Make time for smelling the roses. Don’t get so hyper-focused on your entrepreneurial pursuits that you forget to enjoy your family, your friends and all the wonder in the world. Try to lead a balanced and healthy lifestyle. Balance makes everything in life run more smoothly.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest mental roadblock that most of us face is faith. You have to believe in yourself, your abilities and your right to succeed. It takes a special kind of individual to strike out into the unknown, believe that you are that special and capable person. Embrace the pioneer spirit!

You must be the kind of person who is ready, willing and able to learn new skills and concepts. You are, after all, a member of the most adaptable species on this planet. You have an amazing capacity for learning and growth, believe in that.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Personal freedom is definitely up there when it comes to living the “entrepreneurial dream”. For me I want a chance to do what I love. Blog and website design with my own graphics. If I can make money doing that, what a rush! I’ll be working at my dream job and bonus out by being my own boss. It’s like getting paid to play!

Who could ask for anything more?

Donna- DazzlinDonna.com @DazzlinDonna

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I’ve been making my living working from home for several years now. The Internet has given me the opportunity to do the things I love to do, while still earning money and paying the bills. Much of the last few years were spent educating others on the subject of SEO, but I did that mainly as a way of giving back. My real job involves creating my own sites for fun and profit.
From www.dazzlindonna.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Stubbornness comes to mind. The refusal to quit may be something rooted deep within a soul, and I don’t know if it can be learned or not. But many people, when told they “cannot”, set out to prove they “will”. The stubborn refusal to quit so that one can prove to one’s self or to the world that they will succeed is what drives me on. That – and the fear of ever stepping foot into a cubicle again.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental roadblock was wondering if I knew enough to make it work. Of course, I didn’t know enough, but luckily I just kept on, learning more and more each day, until things started clicking.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I was always a very hard worker. That didn’t change when I stopped working for others and started working for myself. I still work hard, and I even work longer hours now. But the freedom of choice is what is all encompassing, and life changing for me. For many, many years, I was an insomniac. I still am, really, but not to the same extent.

At one point though, I was only getting 5 hours of sleep per week. (That’s less than an hour per day, yes). Of course, bodies adjust to those extremes, and while it’s not perfect, I was able to function fairly well. The hardest part though, was the fact that I wanted to sleep at the wrong times. Most people get sleepy around 2 in the afternoon, right? Well, my body strongly wanted to sleep then, but of course, that’s just not an option when you’re working a “real job” from 8-5 in some office somewhere.

Now, I sleep when I want. I’m free to choose to lay down at 2 in the afternoon. There’s no fear of a boss clucking disapproval, or worse. If I have an appointment, there’s no longer any worries about telling my boss I have to take time off for it. If I wake up one morning with the flu, I no longer cringe at having to call in sick. I may have to face the fear of whether or not a steady income will be available, but I will never again face the fear of a boss. That is huge for me.

Chris- ChrisGuillebeau.com @ChrisGuillebeau

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I’m interested in the convergence between highly personal goals and service to others. I use the metaphor of world domination (ruling and changing the world at the same time) to highlight all the things we can achieve when we choose to live with gratitude and purpose.
From chrisguillebeau.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

The first thing is to decide of soldiering on is the right thing. In the long-run, it’s very difficult to continue doing something you’re not motivated to do — so in some cases, it’s better to completely change direction and pursue something different that you’re really excited about. But if soldiering on is indeed the best choice, then it helps to think of the end-game. Why are you doing what you do? What’s the goal? Sometimes thinking about the outcome helps the day-to-day come together.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The fear of failure, the fear of giving up, and in some ways the fear of success. Fear in general was a real problem.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I’d agree that personal freedom is the leading benefit. At some point we have to connect our personal freedom with a greater purpose, because most of us are still fundamentally unhappy if it’s all about us — but yes, achieving freedom and independence is certainly a huge win.

Mike- ToiletPaperEntrepreneur.com @TPEntrepreneur

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With limited resources and no experience, he systematically bootstrapped a multi-million dollar technology business, sleeping in conference rooms to avoid hotel costs. After selling his first company, Mike launched a new business the very next day, and in less than three years, sold it to a Fortune 500. With his newest multi-million dollar venture, Obsidian Launch, he grows authors and experts into industry superstars.
From www.toiletpaperentrepreneur.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Mind-numbing adversity indicates that you are doing one of two things. Too many things that keep you bouncing around, or one thing that isn’t bringing results. So if you are running after little projects here and there… you need to shift and focus ONLY on the thing that has worked best for you.

Become masterful at it… I mean the world’s best, and then you will grow. Alternatively, if you do one thing and it isn’t working… when it becomes mind numbing, it indicates it is not working and you MUST make a shift to something new.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental road block was that I had to do it all. I have a propensity to keep doing things, because I think no one can do it better than me. And that is the biggest mistake any entrepreneur. Others are almost always better. We all are very good at very little. So once I shifted to recognize others are better than I am, I learned to delegate effectively and my business took off.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

The best part of the entrepreneurial dream to me is “I made a difference.” I love thinking that in the smallest way I changed the way the world operates. That I made it better in a certain way. That feels very fulfilling.

David- HeroicDestiny.com @HeroicDestiny

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I believe with everything in me that there has to be something more to this life than the way everyone around me is living it.

I understand that doing things differently involves risk but am convinced that the people I love and the things I love doing are worth it.

I know that the worst outcome possible is doing nothing.

From www.heroicdestiny.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Everyone warns you to not compare yourself against the people who are where you want to be. Good luck with that since I think it is against human nature (if nothing else, I have yet to figure out how to do it). Instead I recommend that if you see someone who is where you want to be, go back to the beginning of the blog (if they’re cool enough and smart enough to keep one) and read from their earliest stuff to the present date.

Look at how you compare against the noob version of your heroes and you’ll immediately start to feel much better…they were all unpolished at one point too. But don’t stop at that boost of serotonin…keep reading. Pay attention to what things they started to change and how they were successful at each turn.

Compare THAT with what you are doing and see what you should consider changing. There’s no reason to reinvent the wheel; there’s also no reason why YOU have to be the one to make the mistakes. In short, look at the journey others took and learn from what they did.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I know for a lot of people they struggle to believe it can be done. Thankfully, I didn’t struggle with that. Rather I struggled with what “it” was. In the beginning I knew that I wanted to do something but couldn’t define it at all. Finally I made the decision to just start blogging and connecting with people and see what happened.

Wanna know what happened? (Of course you do or you wouldn’t still be reading this.) My brain started thinking of things to do. I made connections with people who wanted me to join with them on the things THEY were doing. You can’t steer a parked car…so put it in drive and see where it goes (also look out for pedestrians).

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I would say it is freedom, but not in the way everyone thinks of it. Sure, the ability to sleep in late and rule your schedule is this golden city that everyone thinks they want to get to. Truth of the matter is for me, that’s not what has been the greatest reward. For me the fact that I’m living my life intentionally (big theme of mine) is so amazing that I want to sit down with anyone willing to listen and share with them how awesome it!

So many people feel that they are victims of their life, their circumstances, their relationships, their whatever’s. When you start taking the steps to live your life intentionally, things start to change. Your life is no longer always at the mercy of circumstances. Relationships are richer and ones that aren’t fall away. It’s like Dorothy landing in Oz and her black and white world has suddenly been filled with Technicolor. THAT is the most amazing thing for me…and I haven’t even come CLOSE to the Emerald City.

Erica- Erica.biz @EricaBiz

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Certainly, I can tell you from experience that money makes you more of who you already are; you can have a lot of money and still be depressed, sick, or lonely.

My answer is that I have big goals, and I believe those big goals require money. I believe that we create our own reality and everything in it.

From www.erica.biz (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point. And it appears as though you are having a bit of a struggle recently as well.

There are two separate things here, I think: “mind-numbing” and “adversity”. I wouldn’t call adversity–that is, the “haters” and others who attack you–”mind-numbing”. But I would call things like moderating comments and writing an autoresponder sequence mind-numbing. Those are things I don’t like doing.

As far as the haters go, take a few days off and re-center if you have to. I took a much-needed vacation where I basically didn’t look at my blog for over 3 days. Taking some time off really gave me the perspective I needed.

For the mind-numbing stuff, I recommend outsourcing. You don’t have to hire a full-time worker; you can find someone hourly through oDesk or other sites to help you. And often, outsourcing is cheaper than you’d think.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental roadblock was the belief that people wouldn’t pay more than the going rate for my services. Being frugal myself, I still struggle with this sometimes. This belief nearly bankrupted my business. Finally, with my back against the wall and the business about to go under, I doubled, tripled, or in some cases, even 10x’ed my clients’ rates.

I assumed half my customers would leave, but 95% of them stayed! That was a real turning point for my business. In most cases, customers value the relationship more than they value the lowest price. And, if I’m being totally honest with myself, the relationship is why I buy services often, as well.

The takeaway: Your rates should be higher than average, and you should go after the customers who value that relationship more than they value the lowest cost. If you aren’t losing customers because they say your rates are too high, you’re not charging enough.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

For me, it is the ability to control my own destiny. I can do whatever I want, whenever I want, as long as I keep in mind that I have to sell something to keep income coming in. I can sell only the products and services I feel amazing about, and I’m not beholden to others who tell me what to do. Freedom is a beautiful thing!

Andy- ComLuv.com @CommentLuv

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I’ve lived all over the place in the UK and Europe, I’ve traveled far and wide for pleasure and business and I used to speak semi-fluent Greek. I’ve been a casino pit boss, an IT trainer, a Royal Navy Artificer, a paper boy, written a published game, read a squillion sci-fi books and watched a squillion movies.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point. And it appears as though you are having a bit of a struggle recently as well.

If it’s all you’ve got, you shouldn’t need a kick. it’ll be all you have so there’s nothing else to do except to do nothing and we can’t ever do nothing! If you have got something else, do that instead, you’ll get pulled back. If you’re an entrepreneur then you won’t let something beat you. ever.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

For me, it’s always been other people. Either convincing them to come onboard or allowing myself to be convinced BY them that something won’t work. Everybody lies, including you to yourself. Once you get over that, you can just ignore everyone/thing and just get on with what you believe in. It’s my bloody single mindedness that has kept me going when all seemed ( to others) lost.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Waking up and doing what I enjoy doing without thinking about it as a ‘job’. I’d do it if I wasn’t getting paid to do it and that makes life so much more fun to live through. Doing this kind of work means I don’t have to do anything else to pay the bills which means I have even more time to do it!

Jorgen- JorgenSundberg.net @JorgenSundberg

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Jorgen Sundberg helps companies and people attract more business by effective use of social media, personal branding, blogging, online engagement and digital PR.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Networking is definitely what has worked best for me. It’s worth getting to know not only your potential customer base but anyone in your industry, including the competition. You’ll be surprised how many people are happy to give you help and advice for free, even if they are in direct competition with you. Networking will also lead to good friendships as you are likely to meet people with the same interests as yourself.

A great start to building your network is social media and blogging, no surprise there. I have found though that best relationships are often formed offline, so use Twitter to find people but then use Meetup to see where you can see people in the flesh – which is much more powerful.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

There are lots of roadblocks out there, and they all stem from a fear of the unknown. My first one was financial, giving up a lucrative job is not something you do in any haste. Instead, I started saving up enough money to have a long burn rate and to give me enough time to achieve success on my own.

The second was knowing exactly what value to add and how to make money (call it a business plan if you like). this took time to formulate and as soon as the business took off you realize that it’s a case of reacting to your customer’s needs as opposed to thinking you know exactly what they want.

The last one was knowing when to take the plunge. I probably took too long to launch my business, I was waiting for the perfect opportunity but I now know you can never achieve perfect timing – just do it as they say.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Freedom is huge, I’m so glad I don’t have to be in boring meetings, I don’t have to write reports nobody will read and I don’t have to stay late in the office just because it looks good. Another important thing to me is helping people, with blogging and speaking I am able to help normal folks out there and I get kudos for it – probably more important to me than money.

Chris- ChrisG.com @ChrisGarrett

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He has been involved in several startups and has written for some of the webs best-loved blogs.

In 1994 Chris first became addicted to the Internet. Since then he has helped thousands of individuals, non-profits, small businesses and blue chips make the most of the web. In 2005 Chris founded a company to help businesses achieve more with Online Media.

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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

What keeps me motivated is remembering WHY I am doing what I do, and I try to focus on how I help people, the positive feedback, and the good people it has brought into my life. Of course it does get difficult at times so it helps if what you do is something you have a passion for to begin with.

Once I got to the stage where I could choose if I wanted to work with people or not it transformed my situation – surrounding yourself with supportive, kind, generous and all-round awesome people can help you through some very rough patches!

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I was very fortunate in that I was pretty much shoved into knowing it could be done, and even had a taste that *I* could do it early on. The thing that has challenged me most in the past is fear. Fear of failure and not being able to support my family long term, fear of letting people down, and fear of pushing myself into the spotlight. I am very shy on occasion and that has been something I have had to work to address. We all have our issues, it helps to find partners who compliment your strangeness ;)

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Personal freedom was the goal and the biggest benefit. I love what I do, I love the people I work with, but if I had to choose one thing it would be that. Everything comes back to that with me. Freedom to spend time with my family, freedom to travel, freedom to make choices.

The income is not about the money past being able to pay the bills, money means freedom. If you had told me even five years ago that I would be traveling over 100,000 miles or something stupid each year I would have called you crazy. For example we just got back from Australia where I got to spend the week with Darren in Melbourne and then all three of us (wife, daughter and I) had another week where we relaxed around Brisbane.

That was our second trip to Australia in 12 months! In a few weeks I will be in Las Vegas, then we move to Canada, and right after I will be in Las Vegas again. But you know what they most cool part is? I get to go to every one of my daughter’s school events, from recitals to sports days. When I worked for a boss I didn’t get to see any of that, I even had to book vacation days to go to the doctor. So, yes, freedom is the best part.

Jennifer- JennsZen.com @Jennifer_Good

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I’m a passionate entrepreneur who loves to work on projects that offer creative challenges and learning experiences. I love everything I do and do just about everything. As founder of a multitude of companies, my experience in the online realm is extremely vast. However, my main specialty is building high traffic community-based websites.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

While the temptation to give up is strong when you’re facing adversity, belief in yourself and what you’re doing will help you through it. When I feel like everything is going against me I look for at least one thing that is going right and I cling to that. It could be someone who is there for me in moral support and takes the time to boost me back up.

Sometimes reading testimonials or favorable comment from people I’ve helped is just the ticket. The point is to put your attention on what’s working and let the rest of the negativity sort itself out. Everything is a phase and you just have to make it until this one passes.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I don’t know that my roadblock is very common, however, for me it’s always been that what I’m doing doesn’t feel “real.” Working online isn’t the same as having customers walk through your door or a having a tangible product that you physically ship out.

I watch the stats climb, but it doesn’t always seem real to me, especially when they start trending upwards quickly. I automatically assume there is something wrong. I’ve worked on handling this issue by setting up more “physical” meetings with clients and trying to focus on establishing real connections with my readers and visitors through commenting and other social networks.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I think freedom is a goal we all hope for when we start an entrepreneurial venture. It isn’t always about the money, but rather what the money gets us, which is freedom to live how we want. Another great benefit is being exposed to other wonderful people you might never have met. I think even over money, the friendships you establish with other like-minded people is really what helps get you through the ups and downs of creating your own dream life.

Stanford- PushingSocial.com @PushingSocial

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Authenticity is rooted in reality. Authenticity speaks to having your values, beliefs, and actions aligned. Authentic stories just feel right. They come from a place of real passion. I believe that the only authentic stories worth telling come from you, your employees, and your product.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

When things get especially hard, I narrow my vision to the “next smallest thing”. I immediately try to find an incremental action that I can take to keep me moving forward. Sometimes holding the big vision in mind is temporarily too much. The loneliness and fear only increase when you wallow in it. Momentum cures all :)

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Biggest Mental Roadblock? Pursuing Dreams rather than Priorities. I learned this from Dave Navarro. Dreams are nice to have and ponder but they don’t really move the program forward. However, priorities are concrete and force you to pay attention to them. It’s amazing how we move heaven and earth for priorities. Mentally I am in a place where success = execution not weeks of wasted planning and dreaming.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I love having the freedom to make a real difference for other social media up-and-comers. It feels like I’m connected with thousands of people who are working for a more humane and responsive business environment. That is incredibly fulfilling.

Maren- EscapingThe9to5.com @MarenKate

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I’ve been starting businesses since I was 19 and currently work full time as an entrepreneur, from coffee shops (I love the energy) or my home office. I love all things start up related and am a firm believer in starting a business that will change the rest of your life.
From www.escapingthe9to5.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

I don’t know if there is one quick fix, or even a complicated, involved one. My best advice is to focus on your goal above everything else, if that means you want to move your family to Bali than no matter what happens you won’t stop constantly pushing forward until you are wiggling your toes in those beautiful white sand beaches.

Also I suggest people read books like “The Dip” & “The Tipping Point” it helps outline the process anyone must go through to hit true success, if success was easy or even just mildly difficult everyone would be doing it – but success is very, very hard. Anyone who tells you otherwise is lying, you may hit success after 2 months on the web but you’ll hit your hardships sooner or later. I’d rather get them out of the way in the beginning and learn my lessons early on.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental roadblock was that I could actually live the life of my dreams. I wasn’t afraid of hard work I had just always grown up with the concepts that money, success and abundance was scarce and always would be. In reality it’s the complete opposite. It’s just that most people refuse to believe it and then refuse to work towards their goal.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I’m happy to go to ‘work’ every morning and I know in a very short amount of time, after over a year of very, very hard work I am at the point where I’ll be able to do whatever I want, whenever I want… which is my ultimate goal.

Jean- VirginBloggerNotes.com @JeanSarauer

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I learned there are a lot of people who feel just like me. They want to start a blog for profit or for creative expression, but they feel too dumb or too scared to pursue their blogging dreams.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Pare down to the absolute essential tasks and then focus on those things like your life depends on it. Because it does, really. Sanity and productivity are found by losing ourselves in the one task that’s in front of us. The adversity and challenges around us may be out of our control, but writing this one sentence or making this one phone call is completely within our control.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My roadblock was setting boundaries with friends and family. People presumed since I was working from home that I was available to pick up kids from school, go have coffee, and entertain drop-in guests at any given moment. A couple people dropped out of my life entirely when I chose my work over their wishes, but this is how it has to be.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

My business marries my two greatest passions–creating and connecting–so working energizes me and fills me up inside rather than depleting me the way traditional jobs usually did. Really, being able to do what I love, when and how I choose, is the stuff that dreams are made of.

Mars- MarsDorian.com @MarsDorian

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Join the Digital Crusade and make your online entrepreneurship awesome – with endless fire inside.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Focus is the answer to everything – it’s my religion. As an entrepreneur, you have to ignore the negative magic that wants to corrupt your ambitions. It doesn’t matter who’s against you or what challenges you have to face. It doesn’t matter if the whole world breaks down on you – just focus on what needs be done, and then freaking do it. It’s the only way to kick-ass in (business) life.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

For me that would be thinking about what others think about me: You can’t do it. That’s too hard. Nobody accomplishes that. Blah Blah – all of this is useless.

Whenever I feel like the world is against me, I remind myself: In the near future, you and me, we are all going to turn into stardust. Vanished into oblivion, gone forever. Remembering that puts everything into perspective. Nothing matters in the big scheme, so you might as well rock it in the smaller one :)

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I luv to have control of my own destiny. As entrepreneur, you can do whatever you want without having to ask a gatekeeper (like a boss) for permission. You want to do something, and you just do it. Boom – just like that. You can always ask for forgiveness later :) Being your own boss let’s you live to the fullest potential. You will reach (inner) places where normal workers only dream of being. Start your own business online. It makes you number 1 right from the start.

Srinivas Rao- TheSkoolOfLife.com BlogCastFM.com @SkoolOfLife

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I started this blog almost a year ago with no idea where it would take me and it’s been one of the most rewarding journey’s I’ve ever experienced.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Persistence, Persistence, and More Persistence. The first 50% of accomplishing most goals if fairly painful for several reasons. First, there’s very little visible progress so that can be demoralizing. But what people need to realize is that once you get past the first 50% or to the other side of the mountain, things get really good.

It’s basically been my experience with learning how to surf, which I’ll do for the rest of my life. The other thing is that people should focus on how far they have come rather than how far they have to go because the perspective changes to a positive one.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I’m kind of a blend of entrepreneur/day job. So my situation is unique. I think the biggest mental block for me was being ok with uncertainty. Fear of the unknown is a really unfortunate virus that has spread like wildfire through our society. Yet, overcoming this is what has resulted in some of the best things we’ve produced as a society.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Well, as a surfer, it’s being able to schedule my life around surf conditions. When a big swell hits I can adjust everything so that I can spend my time in the water. I also think that the freedom to travel is amazing. If you’re not traveling and seeing as much of the world as possible you’re only living a small percentage of your life.

Fabian- FriendlyAnarchist.com @FabianKruse

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While my personal style of anarchism has not much to do with bombs and chaos (other than ice cream bombs and the permanent chaos on my desk, that is), I think it’s time to take our lives back and lead them the way we want, without giving all our responsibility away to governments and employers.
From www.friendlyanarchist.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

As someone finding myself at the very start of this entrepreneurial journey, I certainly can relate to this feeling. My best advice would be to acknowledge that the world is big enough for you to do your thing. That can be hard for many of us who were taught our whole lives to get good marks and build a perfect CV in order to impress recruiters.

The truth for an entrepreneur is this: Recruiters and CVs don’t matter, your customers do. But, at least if you’re aiming to be (and stay) small, as I do, you don’t need a million customers in order to make a living.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I actually thought that business and entrepreneurship were both boring and incredibly hard to do. I really thought you had to compete with the big players, get a credit or an investor, and make a million dollars or fail horribly.

That’s not true, of course: First of all, you don’t have to compete with Wal-Mart, but find an interesting niche (or two) and serve it well.

Secondly, you don’t have to be a “successful entrepreneur” in the typical US American sense of the word. I don’t have a seven figure income. In the past 12 months, I didn’t even have a *five* figure income. This is by design, though: In a time when everybody insists on growing fast and running around with all guns blazing, I decided to grow slowly and organically, and be conscious about what I want to sell and what not.

The lesson is this: Business doesn’t have to work like it has during the last couple of decades. But it doesn’t have to work the way smart-ass online marketers want you to believe, neither! You don’t have to sell bullshit to people just because they buy it. You don’t have to be a big player. You are free to decide to live more frugally and focus on experiences rather than on making your first million. You are free to sell less, but live more.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I can get up whenever I want in the morning. Or in the afternoon. If I feel like it, I can spend 14 hours at my computer, writing. Or I can go to the beach, swim a bit, have a glass of fine rum, and read a book. If money becomes an issue, I can work more; if the money’s good and the income is flowing, I can do less or work for free for some time. It is indeed a way of great personal freedom.

Another thing that really benefits me is that being a micro entrepreneur and freelancer allows me to do a great variety of things: I write for my blog or others, translate or interpret, do really small web design jobs, outline upcoming projects, take photos, help out in a village here in Colombia, write mails, skype with or meet interesting people, look after my finances, etc. – it’s just great to not being forced to do the same stuff all day, each day. As an entrepreneur, there are always new challenges coming up, and if you get bored, you just dive into another venture.

Karol- RidiculouslyExtraordinary.com @KarolGajda

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Specifically, I want to help you achieve your idea of freedom, whatever that may be.

Why 100? It’s not that I think changing the lives of 1,000 or 10,000 (or more) is unattainable. I will do that too. But first I’d like to get to know and directly help 100 people.

Once the goal is reached this Web site will self destruct and I will vanish into the ether. More accurately, I’ll just go hang out somewhere cool, but that doesn’t sound as intense, does it?

From www.ridiculouslyextraordinary.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Most adversity is a result of being too far into our own heads. Its cliché, but nothing is ever as bad as it seems. Best advice for soldiering on? Don’t make it a choice. There is no other option.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Most successful people I know question themselves and their value at some point or another. And that has always been my biggest roadblock. Although I wouldn’t call it a roadblock. More of a speed bump.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

It really boils down to being able to do what I want, when I want, with whoever I want. Maybe the best thing about it is that my life is mostly anti-stress. If anything, I have eustress.

Mary- GoodLifeZen.com @Mary_Jaksch

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As well as being a writer, I’m a Zen master and psychotherapist. I hold a 4th Dan Black Belt in Karate and love dancing Argentine tango in skimpy dresses.
From writetodone.com (share this quote)

Mary is also chief editor of WriteToDone.com, a blog geared specifically towards writers of all walks.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Just before I started my journey as a blogger I lost all the inheritance that my mother had left because I trusted the wrong kind of people. I found that the most important thing that allowed to overcome the shock and the despair was that I didn’t look back. I decided not to dwell on my inner stories of regret, blame, and self-doubt.

In order to let go of these thoughts, I started wearing an elastic wrist band. Whenever my thoughts turned back to the financial catastrophe, I changed the wrist band to the other arm. At first the wrist band flew from arm to arm, but in time I learned to dwell on positive thoughts, and let go of negative ones – and that helped me to move forward into my new career as a blogger.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I’m an accidental entrepreneur. What held me back at first was that I felt guilty about making money. But now that I’ve built a six-figure online business, I’m happy that I can help so many other people with my income, not just myself.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I love the freedom that allows me to create something amazing that can enhance not only my life but the lives of many others.

Annabel- GetInTheHotSpot.com @GetInTheHotSpot

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My writing’s been featured on the most popular blogs on the Internet including Zen Habits, Problogger and Copyblogger. I make serious topics fun because Internet marketing and business success don’t have to be boring, and I keep you motivated because you’ll need to persevere to succeed.
From www.getinthehotspot.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

There are always hurdles on the road to success or getting the life you want. If you look at any success story it starts with someone who has a dream of getting from A to B but an obstacle stands in their way.

The bigger the goal the more adversities you’ll have to overcome so do focus on the end of the story and the big picture then keep pressing on regardless. Sometimes it seems as if no progress is being make and that’s normal too. Then one day you make ground, try something new and hit a “lucky” break.

The question here holds the answer – soldiering on. No matter what adversities are thrown at you keep moving forward and never give up. Studies show that being able to stick at something is a more important gauge of success than having a high IQ.

To get what you want out of life and achieve your goals you need to persevere. So motivate yourself to carry on trying by keeping your long term goals in mind. Picturing yourself succeeding should help you carry on going for it and raise your spirits no matter what life throws at you.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Confidence. I still battle with low confidence and always will. Some days I feel supremely confident and think I can conquer the world and other days I just want to stay in bed and wonder why I bother trying. But I never do. I get up, put on my confident hat and carry on

I also care too much about what other people think of me and my plans and end up being exposed to negativity because of that. Usually the naysayers are people who don’t understand your vision or are scared by it. Even your nearest and dearest can sow seeds of doubt because they don’t want to see you fail.

The fear of failure may be keeping them stuck on a safe path but if you want to achieve your goals then you have to carry on with your risk-taking journey regardless. Understanding your mental roadblocks and what’s causing them can help you become more determined to overcome them and succeed anyway.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I’ll have to go with personal freedom too. When you work for yourself or create your own business the possibilities are endless. You can choose to work as much or as little as you want. You can set ambitious goals for world domination and a place on the rich list or lifestyle goals like going for a surf every day and living a relaxed lifestyle in the tropics. You choose who you want to work with, when you work, where you work, what you wear and how you get paid for your time. I recommend it and can’t imagine life any other way.

Dan- PersonalBrandingBlog.com @DanSchwabel

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Dan Schawbel, the Managing Partner of Millennial Branding LLC, is a world renowned personal branding expert. He is the international bestselling author of Me 2.0, and the publisher of the Personal Branding Blog.
From www.personalbrandingblog.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

You need to figure out what you’re passionate about, what your true talents are, and how you can bridge both, while taking a non-saturated niche in your market. You always need long-term goals, confidence, strong relationships with key players in your industry, and a little luck. You need to drop all of your fears and just make things happen, without questioning yourself too much.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest roadblock for me was when I was first starting out and no one would answer my emails. It made me worker harder and reach out to more people though and eventually those people that I reached out to answered me when I had some level of status.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Personal freedom and having your hobby be your business. I haven’t worked since January when I quit my full-time job.

Matt- LifeWithOutPants.com @MattChevy

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I am all about getting the most out of life – and believe in the power of choice, knowing that I can’t control everything, but can control a lot. I strive to forge connections, build relationships, and establish friendships whenever possible. I’m a connector. I bring people together. I believe that ultimately, we are put on this earth to ask questions – to challenge each other – to motivate and help one another – and to inspire others, and in turn, ourselves, to achieve greatness. That’s where I come in. I live in the moment, living for a great ‘today’ and an even better ‘tomorrow’.
From www.lifewithoutpants.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Figure out what you need. I know it sounds simple, but this is the biggest obstacle that screws aspiring entrepreneurs up and holds them back from getting where they want to be. Figuring out what you need – not what you want – is a freeing experience. Everybody wants to make a lot of money, or at least enough to be comfortable, support themselves and their family, but it’s figuring out what you NEED, the bare essentials, rent, food, etc, that will help you relax and thrive.

When I started out, I figured out I only needed $2,000 per month to essentially break-even from what I was making at my 9 to 5 (that’s not a lot, people). Once I figured that out, I started hustling, and quickly realized that I was not only getting what I needed, I was far surpassing it and for the first time in my life, actually putting away money into savings.

Money can and will try to hold you back – don’t let it. Odds are you don’t need as much of it as you think.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Realizing and accepting that I can’t do it all. It’s hard to be an entrepreneur – it’s even harder to be one who’s trying to tackle everything.

Let other people in – put your walls down a bit and focus on forming partnerships and business relationships with those who possess complementary skills. Don’t focus on the competition, odds are there are a million other people out there doing what you’re doing – but there’s plenty of business for all of us to be MORE than successful.

Instead focus on collaboration – admit when you don’t know how to do something, don’t lie or make false promises to your clients. Be honest and admit when something isn’t in your realm of expertise.

The beauty of forming partnerships, you’ll build a powerful network that will allow you to offer MUCH MORE than you ever could by yourself…

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I love what I do. I wake up every morning and don’t dread ‘going’ to work. Sure, work is still work, I’d rather be vacationing with my wife or hitting up the golf course with my buddies, but work should be more than work – it consumes such a HUGE part of your life that if you don’t love what you’re doing, you need to be doing something else.

I don’t LIKE my job every single day – but I do LOVE what I do. And that’s what it all comes down to…

James- MenWithPens.com @MenWithPens

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What you need to know is that we give a damn about our clients. A very big damn, in fact. Whether you’re a solopreneur just getting started or a mid-sized company looking for better bottom-line profits, our goal is to bring your business serious results – and fast.
From menwithpens.ca (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

The thing is that entrepreneurs are those who have decided a path that forces them to face adversity – the very nature of an entrepreneur’s personality is one of, “I’m going to achieve this, come hell or high water.” It wasn’t, “I’m going to achieve this, but only if it’s easy.”

Then we wouldn’t be entrepreneurs, would we? Because the goals we pursue? They’re big ones. Big dreams. And we want them bad. We’re hungry to achieve those goals, and we go after them voraciously.

(Side note: www.petershallard.com has a great free ebook about just this, all for entrepreneurs.)

I think it’s key to always focus on your goal. People will say, “Do what you love,” but the thing is, love is fickle. You fall into it and out of it repeatedly and naturally. But when you know what your ultimate goal is – the honest, true, real one, not just the “I want to be rich” one, then you tend to persevere a little more.

For example, I can tell you my vision of where I want to be in 5 years, down to what I’m eating for lunch that day – achieving that level of success is my goal. So I filter everything I do NOW with, “Do I like doing this? And if I do this, does doing this help me achieve that?” If yes, great. If not, out it goes.

Knowing that what I’m doing helps me get there makes a lot of difference. I think of that ultimately perfect day, and get to work – and I have motivation to stick to it.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Good question, this one. I’ve faced many, many roadblocks, but I’ve always had the attitude that I could smash through them – I love a challenge, so it’s always a question of, “Crap, this is in my way. How can I get around it?” Which means that… well, roadblocks never really were roadblocks, because I always found an answer or a solution.

I suppose one roadblock that’s held me back and still is would be a discomfort with flying. If I had the easy ability to walk onto a plane and travel, I’d probably achieve an even higher level of success than I enjoy now – attend seminars, meet colleagues, explore opportunities, etc. But a bad flight ten years ago and the (stupid) decision not to get back on a plane relatively quickly following that even has left me with a good amount of anxiety about flying.

Thing is, I can’t even honestly say I have a fear of flying, because I haven’t even gotten on a plane to test whether I do or not. Maybe I’d sit down and be just fine, telling myself an idiot for having waited so long. Call it pre-flight fear. :) Whatever it is, it’s a major obstacle!

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Ah, jeez, where shall I start? ;) I love all the perks like making my own schedule, having all my sunny afternoons off, living a prestigious lifestyle, owning my own business, making my own money, etc etc… but that’s not really it.

What I love the most is knowing that I can be whatever I want and do whatever I want. Not in the tra-la-la-skip-off-into-the-sunset-no-responsibilities-all-freedom mindset of “do what I want”, but the opportunity to have any career I choose. I can open any business I’d like. I can figure out what I need to do to make any dream I have happen.

Maybe that’s what I love the most: a life that means I’m not stagnating. That I’m achieving accomplishments and going after goal after goal – and reaching them. That if I want something, all I have to do is figure out how, and then I have all the potential to make it happen.

I also enjoy the fact that along the way, I’ve picked up so many skills and so much knowledge that I’ll always be just fine – no matter what happens, having the entrepreneur mindset lets me recreate success as many times as I please.

Dennis- Earn1KaDay.com @5buckguy

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Even though we have several hundred members, we have a very “small” family-like feel where people have no problem bending over backwards to help people.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

That’s a great question. As the late great basketball coach Jimmy Valvano said as he was battling cancer: “Don’t give up, don’t ever give up!”.

Most IM’ers do give up way too soon on the way to success, but if you have a solid business plan, and you’re confident you have the skills to execute that plan, you will succeed if you keep at it.

I know, it seems frustrating at times when you see others making more money than you do, working less hard than you do. That’s just the way it is sometimes.

95% or more of IM’ers give up short of their goals. That’s a shame because some of them might have been just days short of their breakthrough.

Another thing to keep in mind is: Why are you doing this? It can’t be just for more money. What are you going to do with that money? Be able to quit a job you hate? Make a better life for your children or spouse? Be able to spend more time with your kids rather than have daycare raise them? Move out of the ghetto?

What’s your why? If you have a strong enough one, the only way you can fail is to quit.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My sin in the beginning was lack of focus. I used to try everything for a few days or weeks, and then move on. when I learned to focus on one thing at a time, it all turned around for me.

Another common roadblock is that people don’t believe that what they know is worthwhile to others. There’s a perception of “if I know this, so does everybody else, or they can find it easily enough online”. That’s just not true. First, not everybody knows all that you know, and second, most people would rather just have that information or service handed to them on a silver platter than do the work to find it. And they’ll gladly pay for the service to hand it to them on that platter.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

To me, it’s freedom and independence. to an extent. I like to be able to work the hours I want, where I want, and call the shots, responsible for my own mistakes, as well as the successes that come.

But more than that, I absolutely love to death the opportunity to help other people, either by encouragement, mentoring, providing a service of some type, or any other way I can.

I like to think that something I’ve done at some point or other has improved someone else’s life (whether it’s their income or otherwise), and that opportunity is more often presented to entrepreneurs, in my opinion.

Jonathan- JonathanFields.com @JonathanFields

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I’ve stumbled, tripped and flat-out failed more times than I like to think about.

But, I’ve also evolved, taken a lot of purposeful risks and now, in addition to being a serial lifestyle-industry entrepreneur, I’ve figured out a way to earn a nice living doing a variety of things I love to with people I love to be around.

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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Before you begin, do everything you need to do to find the sweet spot between what makes you come alive and where there is a pervasive, deep market need. Be utterly convinced you’ve met these two criteria. Then, when the adversity comes, and it always will, reexamine whether those two initial drivers are still valid.

If not, figure out how you need to adapt to the change in assumptions. If so, look at it as reinforcement that what you set out to do is still meaningful, relevant and needed and draw upon that knowledge to refuel the journey.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Conventional wisdom. Realizing that conventional wisdom is the collective assumptions of those who have either tried before and failed or more likely never even had the will to try, then made up rationalizations to feel better about their retreat. Never bind yourself by the perceived wisdom or limitations of others. Kick the tires, then draw your own conclusions.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

The opportunity to not only have a deep impact on people, but to build the culture that surrounds you with people, experiences, missions and activities that let you come alive.

Ali- Aliventures.com @Aliventures

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I believe we’re all here to live the best life we can. One of my big “things” (call it my mission or goal if you want) is helping people make the most of their potential.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Take care of yourself first. You’re not doing you or your biz any favors if you run yourself into the ground. If that means putting your website relaunch or your next product on hold for a bit, then do. Sure, there’ll be some people who sprint forwards like hell, but you’re in this for the long haul.

It’s okay to take a break. It’s okay to lean back when you need to, instead of running forwards. Just have a plan for getting that adversity sorted out, so you can look forward to the day when you’re back on top of your biz again.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I find it really, really tough to say “I’m very good at this.” It seems arrogant — but the truth is, I know I am a good writer. I’m learning to get over myself and accept that … because it’s only then that I can actually help people.

I’ve talked to other creative and entrepreneurial types, and I think this is a really common problem. Because we’re so good at what we do, it feels natural. Writing comes very easily to me, and I constantly have to remind myself that it’s not like that for my clients! The easiest way for me to get my head round it is to watch my sister paint … I can’t draw or paint at all, and it looks like magic to me. To her, it’s easy!

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

I really love bringing the whole of myself to my work. I like being able to be fun and friendly and casual, without a boss breathing down my neck. When I had a day job, I felt like I’d folded all my personality into this tiny tight little package, zipped behind a “professional” look. It took me a while to realize that, as an online entrepreneur, people love to see the real me. :-)

Ali also co-runs ContructivelyProductive.com with Thursday Bram whose interview is just below!

Thursday- ThursdayBram.com @ThursdayB

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One of the differences I’ve found between the way I do things and the way some other writers do things is that I put a big emphasis in creating sources of income not entirely dependent on my clients.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Lately, it seems like I’ve been banging my head up against the wall when I’m working. I’ve hit something of a plateau with my business and I’ve been doing this type of work long enough that I would really like to change things up. But at the same time, I’ve got a big pile of personal stuff going on that means I absolutely need to keep money coming it.

In order to keep myself working, the only thing I could think to do is to create a light at the end of the tunnel for myself. I ran the numbers and figured out where I needed to be to take some time off and figure out what my next move is. This approach means that I’m actually doing more work (and more banging my head against the wall) in the short-term, but I’ve found that since I know that there will be a finite end, I can do it. It doesn’t hurt that part of my time off includes an actual vacation for once in my entrepreneurial career.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

There weren’t a lot of direct mental roadblocks for me in becoming an entrepreneur — I come from a family of entrepreneurs and we’re known in certain circles for being really bad employees. But it did take some shifts in my thinking to realize that I could make money from more creative enterprises. My family tends more towards real estate, selling furniture and other businesses where they aren’t actually creating their products from scratch. It’s a big shift mentally?

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

For me, the absolute best thing about being an entrepreneur is that I have this constant sense that I’m winning, in every way possible. My employed friends complain about their commutes — I don’t really have to get out of my pajamas in the morning if I don’t want to.

My employed friends get a small raise fairly regularly — my income keeps going up by some fairly significant jumps. My employed friends spend all day getting told what to do by their bosses — the only boss I have is myself, and while I’m tough to work for, I can always find a way out of doing an assignment I really don’t want to handle.

Thursday also runs as successful consulting business at HyperModernConsulting.com… a woman of many talents!

Ann- SeoSmarty.com @SeoSmarty

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My Blog Guest has been started by Ann Smarty, a fairly well-known weblogger and social media user. She’s been guest blogging and building relationships in the blogosphere long enough to understand the power of a guest post – and that’s what she wants to share via her little cozy web community.
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Ann is also the founder of MyBlogGuest.com, a very successful forum especially for guest bloggers as well as associate editor for the popular Search Engine Journal.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Yes, we all do and not once during the entrepreneurship career. The advice? I guess it is very personal: different people learn to cope with adversity in various ways. Some take a break, spend time with friends and family. I for one work even harder.

I am workaholic, work is my pleasure and rest. I don’t remember myself not working! Whenever I feel miserable, I just work further until I find encouragement and inspiration again! I do realize it’s a cure for not everyone though.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

That I will be able to work from home. I love people and company. When I was in the university, I couldn’t even go to the local store without a friend! I always had friends around. Then was my first job and a great team. The thought that I will be left alone was making me crazy!

But I had no choice. I was going to become a new mom and had to stay at home with my baby. But for that fact, I wouldn’t venture to become a solo entrepreneur for a long time, I guess. But luckily, I was forced to! And now I am not afraid! I do plan to create a “real” offline team (currently I rely on freelancers) one day – but that’s distant future as I am not going to leave my daughter with anyone else yet!

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Independence. My first and only boss was a great person but he was still a boss. I am Leo, I can’t depend on anyone. I need freedom and independence – only thus I will feel creative and productive enough to be successful!

Fransisco- SocialMouths.com @SocialMouths

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Andrea (my wife) and I are in constant development of our own world full of creativity, independence, new adventures and raising our kids to be awesome human beings.

I believe in leadership and change. I love simplicity, truth and honest open communications. I own a creative mind, just like everybody else. I try to help others achieve.

From socialmouths.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

I think the best advice could be taking action regardless of the current circumstances because sometimes we postpone things thinking that is going to get better. Maybe you can’t launch your idea today but you can definitely start taking steps towards it. Launching an idea today is easier than ever, there is no need to spend 6 months writing a business plan or signing a 1-year lease on an office.

I like doing an exercise in which I list the pros and cons of moving forward, it helps me realize that much of what I consider being against me, are my own assumptions.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

In my case, because I come from a physical business, you know, offices, warehouse and even a call center, my biggest mental block had to do with going virtual, not having a place to drive to in the mornings or not looking at my team face to face. Even while you enjoy checking email in your underwear, it doesn’t feel like you have a business or if you can generate a sustainable lifestyle.

So going virtual was (still is…) pretty heavy. Today my # 1 business tool is Skype.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Being a free agent, which is not the same as “working from home”. I don’t have to be anywhere at anytime, if you look at my calendar you’d probably think I’m a huge loser because I don’t schedule stuff. That’s a choice… and I still do business like that.

I think it’s what you do with it after you already achieved that status. It can help you go from being a “Parent” to being your kid’s best friend, you can get to know yourself or you can increase your TV watching and waste it all, those cooking shows are pretty addictive…

James- InternetMarketingSpeed.com @JamesSchramko

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James Schramko is an Australian Internet Marketer who quit his highly paid job and left the ‘rat race’ after learning and applying powerful Internet marketing strategies.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Lets take the concept of mind-numbing adversity. For most people this is a choice. Make sure you are prepared to ‘pay the price’. Align yourself with a goal worth getting that excites you a LOT! Getting a worthwhile result will require energy, effort and resources. If you want the desired result bad enough you will persist and find a way. Most importantly, make sure you are doing the right things.

Too many business operators get frustrated because they are repeating the same wrong tasks over and over again. Peter Drucker ( a genius business thinker) emphasized the point of doing the right things versus doing things right. The final point I have on this mindset attitude is to ‘be like water’. Water flows around obstacles and can endure heat and cold. This comes from 3000 year old Chinese war strategist Sun Tzu.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Stepping away from a Top level professional career, $300,000 a year job with benefits with five dependents living in one of the worlds most expensive cities. Deciding that my own business was suffering at the hands of the debilitating ‘day job’ finally helped me shift. I sat next to people who were making $100k per month and in one case $100k per day.

This caused me to get the new (and correct) perspective that I was playing too small a game. I honestly felt like my job was pathetic under-performance on my behalf. I more than doubled my income the first twelve months out of work and than doubles it again the next year. Each year for five years in a row our business has in excess of 200% growth.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

I am living versus existing. Not taking orders, not wearing shoes, a tie or expensive suit, living by the beach, doing absolutely nothing (like sleeping in) and feeling good about it, having nice things and spending time with my family… Also I travel all around the world at the drop of a hat.

Jade- JadeCraven.com @JadeCraven

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That’s just a fancy-pants way of saying I rock at social media, word of mouth, referral marketing and all those other ways to describe getting your right people to talk about you.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Build a support network. Find people that can help you get through the rough times. Sometimes you will have to pay for that support in the form of consulting and that’s fine.

Seriously. Trying to go it alone will fuck with your head and reduce the amount of work you can do and people you can help. That’s selfish and not fair on yourself.

I’ve had to soldier through a pretty severe mental illness. There have been days where I’ve refused to get out of bed because my problems seemed so overwhelming and have wanted to just give up on my work. I have a darn good team of friends, colleagues, and family around me to help me through those times. They are who I have to thank for being in business today.

( I would like to mention that if you feel sick over a long period of time from the stress of the adversity, see a doctor. I didn’t realize at first that I had anxiety/depression and getting treated has made things so much better. )

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

This is a roadblock that I am still struggling to overcome. I am struggling to understand why people would want to pay for a skill that comes so naturally to me.

I’m a connector. I hook people up with those that can have a dramatic impact on their career. This can be a potential JV partner, coach or potential employee. I’ve done it for free for the past 2 years because it makes me feel good and I wanted to see if my hunches were right.

My main source of income is Dave Navarro, from The Launch Coach. I love this work because Dave has a no bullshit attitude. I’ve gotten into mini arguments with him on how I feel like I don’t deserve to get paid for what I do and he reminded me that the value I provide is worth far more than what he is paying. I have low self esteem so this has been something that has played on my mind a lot as I’ve started to push myself beyond my insecurities.

But you know what? I am kinda awesome at what I do. Putting a dollar sign in front of my work doesn’t make it any less valuable. If anything, it means I attract the people that respect my time and are willing to take action. It has been a fascinating learning process and I’m really fascinated to see what other roadblocks I encounter.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Put simply, purpose. I am now contributing something to the world and, in small ways, changing peoples lives.

So – I’ve talked about having anxiety. What I didn’t say was that I’ve only had a couple of part time jobs and can’t hack part time work let alone full time work. I got out of high school and was faced with the real world and, due to a lot of stress in real life, had a nervous breakdown. Now, there are a lot of limitations with what I can and can’t do. And it’s cool, I’ve made my peace with it.

As I started getting better, I was really frustrated at how it felt like I wasn’t accomplishing anything. I could barely take care of myself let alone assume any work responsibilities. Then I fell into my work and gosh it just sets my heart on fire.

My business has allowed me to make a real impact on people. A real impact, often in the space of a couple of emails. I can write blog posts that can change careers and touch peoples lives. I am making a difference in an industry that I’m passionate about.

This is what life is freakin’ about. I didn’t think I’d be well enough to get a any sort of employment and next month I’m going off to Blogworld. In a way, I’m glad I got sick because it has allowed me to find, and live, my dream.

Remy- OrangeDisaster.com @ODWebProduction

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Orange Disaster doesn’t believe in shyness when it comes to spreading love. Not only do all of our projects go towards supporting full time ministry and the life of an amazing young lady, but 10% of every project is given towards a local charity or church. Spread Love. Be Love
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Get up and get dressed every day. Think you have a job, look like you have a job, act like you have a job! For me, its all a mental game. If I think about all the set backs then I end up getting set back. The clients/work/what-have-you isn’t going to fall into your lap, you have to get up, get serious and go get it!

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Mine was the idea of going ‘all in.’ I didn’t think I could do it, yet at the same time I knew that if I didn’t I wouldn’t get anywhere that I wanted to be. The hardest part has been telling myself – now after diving in the pool – that I can swim and that I do know how.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Time off when I need it! I can go to church and do all the things that I want to do without having to check in or give 2 weeks ahead notice! Also, I love talking to people my age about work. “What do you do?” I ask. “Oh I work at Subway while going to school for a Poly Sci degree. You?” I smile…. “Oh I own a website design company.”

Sonia- CopyBlogger.com @SoniaSimone

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I’m the marketer for people who hate marketing. My superpower is creating better customer relationships with incredibly effective communication.

That, and I make a kickass chocolate cream pie.

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Sonia is Senior Editor at CopyBlogger and also runs the show on her own blog Remarkable-Communication.com.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

This was the most important issue for me, how to keep going. Because it does take a lot of time, and there are long “dark periods” when nothing seems to be happening. I think what helped me the most with this was connecting with a few good friends who were on the same path, and who had a lot of energy and a lot of faith.

There are always times we lose faith in ourselves and wonder if we should keep plugging away. Those are the times when it’s great to have friends in the same boat who can encourage us to keep going.

I also actually got a ton of encouragement from my own audience, even when it was quite small. Because I always tried to focus relentlessly on helping people, it seemed like every time I wanted to pack it in, I’d get an email from someone saying “Thank you so much for this (whatever it was).

It really made a difference.” I’m a big believer in Zig Zigler’s advice, “You can get anything you want if you help enough other people get what they want.” That was something of a lighthouse for me, when I would feel lost I could orient myself around that.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

It took me a really long time to believe that entrepreneurs could be “people like me.” I thought you had to be able to accept all kinds of crazy risks, and be some kind of fearless macho stereotype.

But the more I look around, the more I realize that the entrepreneurial stereotype is totally wrong. It’s the humble ones who look before they leap who really build success. The macho risk-taker makes himself very visible, but he doesn’t often make his company successful.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

For me the very best thing is to have a vision of something cool to create or do, and just doing it. Without asking permission from some committee, without getting shot down by executives who feel threatened by big ideas. The corporate world was a really painful place for me. I’m finding that building a fabulous, profitable, successful company is the best revenge. :)

Nathan- NathanHangen.com @NHangen

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I’m literally obsessed with watching someone turn hustle and idea into an empire. I’m obsessed with Gary Vaynerchuk’s ability to find focus, passion, and direction, and turn it into the biggest Internet celebrity empire the world has ever seen.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

It’s one thing to say “keep going,” but if what you’re doing isn’t working, you really have to learn why it isn’t. Just working isn’t going to work…you need to work on something that has potential.

I’d say that more than anything, don’t be afraid to make drastic change in order to make something work. Yeah, you can’t quit, but that doesn’t mean you have to keep doing what isn’t working. Try new products, new angles, new people, new writing, new art, etc. Experiment and do more of what works, less of what doesn’t.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Never being happy in a single niche or role. I love doing lots of things, and I always struggled with the idea that I have to pick something and do it. It doesn’t work for me. So in that sense, I think the hardest part was overcoming the programming that told me things had to be done a certain way. Giving myself permission to try and fail.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Being able to wake up without feeling like the world is going to end if I don’t want to. I can create my own schedule and make as much or as little money as I want. It’s stressful, but it’s so great to be free and in control of my own life.

Rob- TheLifeDesignProject.com @RobGranholm

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It’s amazing what taking the time to actually process how you live life, and take steps toward framing how to reach your dreams makes a real difference beyond “saving up” which is what most people’s consider creating a future.
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Rob is also the creator of ITArsenal.com… a kick ass site devoted to us morbidly lacking in geek speak technophobes.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Reboot your brain often. The constant learning, testing, launching, life juggling, and paralysis that ensues when wrapping your brain around everything that needs to be done as an entrepreneur is frustrating. I’ve been there (heck I live there), staring at your website, or glaring at others who seem to be making so many moves when you can’t figure out a 5 word tagline.

First, know that you’re not the only one who’s mind-numbed, then quickly move to reboot and get back into the fray. How? I look at a “top level” document every day to remind myself what the heck I’m doing (in life and business) and to keep my goals in front of me.

I try to talk with other entrepreneurs often to commit myself, get enough sleep, and take one action a day (non-social media) for building my business. When all that doesn’t work and it feels like I’m moving an inch an hour, it’s time to take a few days off to recharge.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest mental roadblock I’ve run into is thinking about my business vs. acting on it. I tend get stuck studying others successes, playing with new tools, or drafting plans or “potential” products for world domination when I should be zoning in and executing. I’ve learned that focusing on raw experience is more important than success, until you have success. I’m still in the trenches practicing this.

Things that help produce? Turning off the Internet, finally launching a product (Don’t wait, just do it. The expectant customer makes you move!), creating and then buying into my own hype, and using my weaknesses as strengths. I now put myself in positions to plan and think for other entrepreneur launches, (as tech support) while I work on my own.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

I foremost love having the opportunity to help others with the skills God has given me, technology and communication! I also purposely build business that lines up with my lifestyle so I’m doing what I enjoy but also creating personal freedoms to pursue life’s adventures. Life’s for living! Long vacations, fast cars, and constant challenges.

Maria- Red-Slice.com @RedSlice

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Maria Ross’ mission in life is to engage, inform and delight audiences . She has over 16 years experience building brands, creating campaigns, generating leads and advising companies big and small on how to tell the right story to the right customers at the right time.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

There is so much and I’m learning more every day but I’d say the big one is to stay true to your mission and purpose and why you started your business. If you have not clearly articulated why you are doing what you’re doing and what success means TO YOU then go, grab a glass of wine and WRITE IT DOWN.  It’s too easy to get distracted and sidelined by stress, opportunities and what other people might think.

There are days when I think I’m not doing enough and days when I’ve overextended myself and I have to remember that I started this business to gain flexibility, work with people I enjoy working with, give myself time to pursue some other artistic passions and that I only have to take in so much money to meet my “success standard.” That helps me take a breath and stop spinning my wheels. Everything else is just noise or other people’s issues – it has nothing to do with your goal.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I had to overcome my corporate brainwashing that people who want to maintain a small business and not go IPO can’t make a real living. Once I stepped out onto the entrepreneurial brink, an entire subculture was revealed to me that I never saw from my cubicle walls. Boutique owners, consultants, nutritionists, tech experts – there is a whole world of people out there doing it, every day.

True, my situation was helped by my husband having a full time job with benefits, but I’ve seen countless others just diving in and doing it on their own – with a little planning and a lot of guts. And they are the very best inspirations and resources to which I turn. I also had to accept that I can go into business for myself and keep myself small and that is okay. I don’t have to turn myself into a global agency with thousands of employees and headaches to be successful. See Question #1!

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Definitely the flexibility to hang out with my dog in the office all day, grab a coffee with a friend, and all of that. Sure, as an extrovert, I miss the collaboration and teamwork (and stability) that comes from corporate, but the best part of all of this?

For as long as I decide to maintain my business, I make the rules. I can say what I want, turn down a high-maintenance client, scale my work up or down as I see fit, and deliver what I think is the right solution. I don’t have to work with people who are mean or nasty if I don’t want to.

No one’s breathing down my neck, vetoing my ideas, “tweaking” my materials, or telling me I shouldn’t say this, or I can’t offer that. I am totally in charge. Scary? Absolutely. And doing my own books and dealing with contracts can suck most days.

But I get to be ME in every aspect of my business and do what I think is right. It is indescribable how much stress on me that alleviates – and I work three times as many hours as I did in corporate, but I’m happier. I love that!

Jenn- JennDize.com

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I have been a full time ghostwriter, search engine optimization strategist, and general go-to gal for over two years now. During this time I have learned exactly what needs to be done to be sure you develop the right kind of online presence, whether you have an offline business or you’re a niche marketer.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

For me, it’s all about having the right motivation. There has to be something that is more powerful than whatever else you’re facing. For me, it’s my children. It doesn’t matter what I’m going through, I know that I always have to keep going because of them. I always want to keep going because of them.

If you feel like giving up, consider why you are doing this in the first place. It can’t be just because you want to “make a ton of money.” It has to be more real than that.

People always seem amazed when they find out that I quit my job without knowing about IM right before my first son was born. It was pretty crazy! However, there was not a doubt in my mind that I would be able to stay home with him as a stay at home mom and still earn money. I knew I was, somehow, going to make it work.

I got started as a ghostwriter when he was a newborn, and nearly immediately started making as much as I had as a teacher. It wasn’t because I had any sort of business experience — I just had no other option. I didn’t allow myself to see any other option.

This is true for me even today. It’s 3 years later. I’m still staying home with my little boys, I earn a great income, and I’m driven to keep soldiering on because I’m a mommy. My purpose in life is to raise great little humans. Staying home with them and providing a nice life for them is why I do what I do. There is no other option, so nothing will stop me.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

That’s a tough one. I didn’t really have a mental roadblock when I first got started. I have had them as I try to increase my income and achieve more success. I have a self-diagnosed “fear of success.” The first time I heard that term, I was positive that that description fits me.

I have the skills and desire to achieve more — to grow my business and take my income to the next level. First, I have to get over my fear of success. I have to fully know that I can reach my income goals. I don’t know what the answer to this is — I’m still searching. Regardless, I have no doubt that I will someday overcome this roadblock :)

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

I love not having to answer to anyone. I remember telling my grandmother from the time I was little that I wanted to be retired already :) I wanted to get through school and retire. Funnily enough, I feel like I’ve done just that.

Sure, I work — I work hard. But it doesn’t feel like work. I get to spend a ton of time with my kids and work on a business I enjoy. It’s the best knowing I can do what I want, when I want to do it. I don’t want a 9-5 job ever again.

Tammy- RowdyKittens.com @RowdyKittens

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RowdyKittens chronicles my writing on how to change the world through simple, minimalist living, while helping others at the same time.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Work on cultivating a sense of happiness in your life. I know that sounds cheesy. But I truly believe if you work on being happy, you will be happy. Right now I’m reading an incredible book called, The How of Happiness. The author, Dr. Sonja Lyubomirsky, points out that 50% of happiness is determined by a genetic set point, 10% is determined by life circumstances (whether you are healthy, married, rich, poor, etc.), and 40% is the result of voluntary actions.

Dr. Lyubomirsky argues that “becoming happier doesn’t just make you feel good;” being happier results in multiple fringe benefits. For example, happier people are more productive on the job, social, energetic, charitable, physically healthier, earn more money, and are more likely to overcome adversity. :)

I highly recommend picking up a copy of The How of Happiness. It’s well worth the money.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest mental roadblock was overcoming my lack of confidence. I didn’t believe I could support myself without a traditional job. But that started to change after I did more reading and networking with my blogging buddies.

They gave me the extra encouragement I needed when I was feeling down. So if you’re ever stuck in a rut or stop believing in yourself, I highly recommend seeking out a support network. Having friends and family who believe in you is so important. They can help you get through the “dip.”

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

For me it’s personal freedom. :) Creating my own small business has given me the opportunity to structure my life on my own terms and pursue my dreams. Don’t get me wrong, I’m very grateful for the many opportunities I had in the traditional employment world. I learned many marketable skills. But in the end, I discovered working for someone else wasn’t a good fit for me.

Tia- BizChickBlogs.com @BizChickBlogs

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Yes, I’m a little pro-woman, I suppose. :) There are a lot of other websites out there for supporting chick bloggers, of course! But for my proteges, they will always have a home here, too.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

The best advice I could give someone facing adversity is to step outside of yourself, look at the situation, and re-prioritize. Take care of things – if you’re facing personal adversity, you might want to get that worked out rather than ignoring it. No one will, on their death bed, wish that they had finished a project or worked harder. As an entrepreneur, we have the luxury of working to live instead of living to work. Nothing is more important than physical and emotional well-being.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest mental roadblock I had to overcome as an entrepreneur was the disbelief that I could charge what I was worth, rather than what I thought someone would pay. It is scary to raise your rates in a time of economic struggle, but I don’t think that’s what holds people back in this area. It’s the thought that you could lose a client over your rates. To this day, that has never happened to me.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

It sounds silly, but for me, it’s knowing that I never have to get someone’s permission to go to the doctor, or to come into work a little late, or to have a me-day. My time is my own to do with it what I wish. I will never have to ask for permission (unless I go back to working for someone else). I cannot imagine having to do that again.

Wille- WillieCrawford.com @WillieCrawford

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His family was so poor that he once wore his grandmother’s shoes to school while working to earn money to replace his only dilapidated pair. This built a burning desire in Willie to break away from the poverty and build his own business.
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

When I encounter adversity, I silently say to myself, “This too shall pass,” reminding myself that I’ve survived everything that life has thrown at me thus far. I also remind myself that there are always those who have it worse than I do. I only need to spend a little time at a local hospital, just sitting in the lobby to confirm that fact.

Then I tell myself to just start taking action, and before I know it, I’ve generally stopped focusing on the adversity, or it doesn’t seem so big anymore.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I grew up with a scarcity mentality, and a belief that money was somehow evil, and that the rich just took advantage of the poor. I had to spend time around those who had an abundance mentality, and let that gradually rub off on me. I also had to learn that having more money also enabled me to do more good.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

It’s personal freedom for me too. After spending 20 years, 10 months in the U.S. military, where you never really knew where you’d be at sundown, I learned to treasure that freedom of choice. That’s also why I’m a bit of a workaholic too. I want to have enough financial freedom to not have to worry about paying bills, to travel when I want to… taking long vacations, and to stop working when I decide to really retire.

Abby- AbbyKerrInk.com @AbbyKerr

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Relationships begin the exchange of currency: your wondrous, empowering, niche-y goods or services exchanged for your right people’s hard-earned money. That’s free enterprise and when created with integrity, it’s pretty beautiful.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

This has got to be the be-all, end-all question for entrepreneurs, the one that keeps us up at night. My best advice for soldiering on comes down to three key things: love {for what you’re doing and for helping the people you help}, vision {the big picture of your life and how this enterprise fits into it}, and desire {you have to have that in spades to keep on going}. Sometimes we lose our grip on one or two of those keys, but as long as we keep holding onto at least one of them at a time, we can get through.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental roadblock so far has been the income potential piece. I observe other creative entrepreneurs out there who are making a better living online than they ever dreamed they could, and also probably better than they could earn in a traditional job.

But sometimes a creepy voice inside me wants to taunt me and tell me that this won’t be possible for me. I just try to kick that’s voice’s a$$ to the curb and remind myself that if others {who are just as creative and smart as I know myself to be} can do it, then so can I.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

For me, the best thing about living my entrepreneurial dream is to know that I create my own work in this world based on my passions and my innate talents and that I encourage and support other people in moving deeper into their dreams. That’s powerful stuff.

Kelly- StickyEbooks.com @StickyEbooks

I love helping authors realize their goals, from inception to final PDF and all the ideas, words and visuals in between.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

When I began my blog to start getting out there as a business, there were moments I was convinced it was absolutely pointless and no one would read it. One day someone emailed me saying how much they appreciated the information I was providing, and I printed it out and put it up where I could see it. I’ve since started a file of emails I call “ego boosters” to remind me that I’m on the right track and remember the good responses and encouragement I get from time to time.

On a more practical note, make sure you’re doing everything to keep your “burn rate” in check. By this I mean, make sure you’re getting some good ol’ cash money coming in first — enough income each week (clients, side jobs, day jobs) before doing less directly profitable stuff, like blogging and networking.

It’s true that you need to do a lot of marketing, so it’s about finding a balance, but make sure your bottom line is covered so you can relax a little. Putting the pressure for your entire income on a new business is just an express ticket to burn out, and it’s a big gamble. Even when your income is totally from your business, make sure it’s diversified (clients, products, etc.) so you can roll with any fluctuations (I am still working on this).

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental block at first was the idea of it even being possible. The idea that people would pay me for such specific skills and that I would find clients from “out there” on the Interwebs. It’s just amazing at how connections build upon each other and there is a market for almost anything.

Another big one for me was putting myself out there – getting more visibility. This meant blogging, doing teleclasses, being interviewed, launching a product and teaching a course online. I’m not really into being in the spotlight, I am more collaborative by nature. But it just took some practice to get more comfortable being out there on virtual stages.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Number one, I absolutely relish never having to ask someone for time off. But beyond that, the best thing about creating a business is knowing I’ve created something new that didn’t exist before. It’s a really cool feeling to step back and look at this growing enterprise and see my experiments and energy paying off.

I imagine an inventor feels the same way – a tweak here and there and suddenly the thing you’ve built has a life and momentum of it’s own. It’s very empowering and makes you feel like there must be so much more that’s possible.

Ana- TrafficGenerationCafe.com @WebTrafficCafe

The change came when I started educating myself about the industry and the proper way to market my business. The road was rough and bumpy, but it took me in the right direction.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

I read comments on my blog. There’s nothing more inspiring to me than to see strangers coming back to my blog again and again, learning, using my advice, asking questions, debating me on issues, growing and helping me grow; strangers who somehow become friends. Who would’ve thought it’s even possible?

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

“Why not me?” was the question I had to answer for myself over and over. If someone else can build a successful blog with floods of daily visitors, why not me? If someone can get their website on the first page of Google, why not me? If someone can build a realistic income online, why not me? Things got a lot easier once I was able to honestly tell myself “Yes, it can and will be me.”

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Having purpose. I always enjoy seeing that there is more to life that the little cocoon I live in.

Pat- SmartPassiveIncome.com @PatFlynn

Getting laid off is a weird feeling. One day you think everything is fine, and for whatever reason the next day you don’t really know what you’re supposed to do anymore. Instead of feeling bad about it, I immediately decided to work for myself and live life exactly how I wanted to.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Facing adversity is part of the job description of being an entrepreneur. Nothing comes easy, but it’s those challenges that shape who we are and what our businesses become.

Honestly, my best piece of advice would be to never be afraid to ask for help. Help can come in many forms, such as advice, answers to specific questions, someone to help with certain tasks, or simply just someone who listens.

When starting out as an entrepreneur, so many people (myself included), have a kind of pride that goes along with doing and figuring everything out on their own. But, when I started to ask for help from people who I knew had more experience than me, and after I joined mastermind groups where I could discuss my businesses, my profits began to skyrocket.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

The biggest mental roadblock on my entrepreneurial journey was a lack of confidence. I would often contemplate, “Am I doing this right?” or “I don’t think this will work.”

Not good.

Not only does a lack of self-confidence slow you down, but it shows in your work. It’s like watching someone make a presentation that you can tell doesn’t believe in what they’re saying. It’s just not believable.

What helped me is just to simply be confident! Don’t let the reason you fail be because you were not confident with your decision.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

The best part is having the freedom to spend time with my family. I’m able to be at home with my wife and 8 month old son, without the fear of ever missing any of my boy’s firsts.

Many people work 9 to 5 to support a family, but it’s kind of ironic that most of their day is spent away from them. It just doesn’t seem right. I pinch myself every day, because I really am living the dream.

John– HiLife2B.com @CJAnyasor

My goal is to achieve a financially-independent, location-free lifestyle by Sept. 19, 2011.

I’m also a firm believer that you can make a living doing what you love, and create a lifestyle all your own.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Before I started on the path to entrepreneurship, I always used to tell myself, “I’ll never give up! All I have to do is push harder than the rest.” Unfortunately, I was being naive. The reality is that you’re going to want to quit so many times, not because the work isn’t fun anymore, but the results you get (at least in the beginning) can be very emotionally taxing.

One day, your stats are way up and you have lots of traffic coming to your site. And because of that you feel great; you’re making progress. The next day, maybe nobody comes and you feel as if it’s your fault. You start second-guessing your decisions and changing things up to appease your now non-existent audience.

The solution is to just take it one step at a time, no matter what adversity lies ahead. Forget about getting big numbers and receiving approval; what matters the most is that you’re doing good work. People will start reaching out to you when they’re ready and the numbers will get better when the time is right.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I have to agree that biggest mental roadblock for me was believing that making a living online is possible. At first, I couldn’t comprehend that I was the same as the people who made thousands of dollars online every month. I used to think that they had something that I didn’t.

And then it hit me like a ton of bricks. They did in fact have something special that I lacked; belief.

They believed in what was possible, in what those before them had already achieved. I was actually no different. Everyone doubts what sounds impossible, but to see for yourself what’s possible yields much more reward and satisfaction.

In the end, I decided to believe. The result? I made over $200 in one day.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

The best thing about the “entrepreneurial dream” is getting paid to do what I love without working under a boss. I’m able to reclaim my time. I don’t have to work for the majority of the day just make money anymore. I’m free to slave away a mere two hours in the afternoon and then experience life afterwards.

What also appeals to me is the freedom to be able to live and work from anywhere. It’s great that I don’t have to sit behind a desk to get my work done; I could be in Guam or Brazil for all I care.

Of course, I don’t recommend focusing on the dream. It’s just a picture of my ideal lifestyle. What matters most are the steps I take each day to get there.

Scott- ScottHYoung.com @ScottHYoung

And, for the last four years I’ve been experimenting to find out how to get more from life. I don’t promise I have all the answers, just a place to start.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Steve Martin once described his road to becoming a comedian as being “more plodding than heroic” and I think the same applies to entrepreneurs. There are many moments of self-doubt and frustration, but patience more than heroic discipline is more important. I ran my business for five years before I was able to make a full time income from it.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Probably my biggest was believing I should, or even could, do it alone. You need other people whether they are partners, mentors or even just peers. I’m sure many more extroverted entrepreneurs wouldn’t have made my mistake, but I feel my biggest amount of waste came from not talking to enough people about what I was doing and asking for advice and help.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

The lifestyle that being a small business entrepreneur creates can be wonderful (otherwise I wouldn’t be here), but for me it’s always been the creative control in my work. Being able to write, produce and share the things I care about trumps location independence, flexible working hours or other much-hyped visions of online entrepreneurship.

Danielle- WhiteHotTruth.com @DanielleLaPorte

I’m interested in liberating truth, raw reality, and grace. I think feminine power and progressive commerce will revolutionize how we live. In my experience, if you steer clear of dogma and muster up more love than you thought you had to give, then your vitality increases, satisfaction sets in, sweetness surfaces. I believe in the creative power of good feelings. I’m convinced that the desire to be real is everyone’s divine imperative. Yeah!
From whitehottruth.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

My advice is to not soldier on. Let me unpack that…too often, we push, and we plow, and we override our deeper instinct and intuition. We ignore fatigue and red flags. If a project you’re doing is starting to feel like a chore, if it’s not lighting you up, if it’s feeling like you’re working for someone else — even though you’re supposedly working for yourself, then you need to lay your burden down and put your energy where it will grow and create a return for you.

When you focus on your true strengths and you follow your enthusiasm, you generate the momentum that is essential for getting good stuff out the door, and sustaining your self through the adversities of creativity and business.

I rarely push myself. I always focus. And that’s made all the difference in getting to where I want to be.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I used to think in order to be a robust and enlightened entrepreneur that I needed to collaborate with people who saw the world differently than I did — that diversity of paradigms made things stronger. Big wrong. As a solopreneur and artist, it’s critical that I collaborate with people who approach business that same way I do. And once we’re on the same page in terms core values, then it all becomes about diversity of skills and strengths.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

I’m so free it makes my giddy. Sovereign. Righteous…Free. I play with people I respect and adore. I strategize on the beach. I pull all-nighters if I’m inspired. I nap. I serve in a way that feeds my soul. Free.

Liz- Successful-Blog.com @LizStrauss

People visit her blog to learn, swap strategies, and meet each other. She’s been called a thought provoker, an über connector, an idea machine. No one questions that what she brings is one-of-a-kind authenticity.

Strategic, intelligent, and nice is a powerful combination.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Sometime in your life you have been successful, mostly because it never crossed your mind to fail. It might have been when you finished high school or university. It might have been when you learned to read … the point is that part of being successful is that we’re sure, actually determined to make our goal.

When roadblocks or obstacles show up, we just move them out of the way. It never crosses our mind to turn back because we see ourselves already at the end with that diploma or that skill set. So my advice is be in with all you have … be determined. Decide (as in “kill off all other options”) that you’re going to do this and you will.

Anything less and you’re secretly planning to fail.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I so love what I do. I can’t NOT do it. I truly WANT to give it away. It’s not that I don’t know the value of what I do. It’s that I find it boring to work on problems that are centered around me. What got me to reach the “escape velocity” that my dear friend, Chris Brogan describes was finding two great partners who found what I do useful and who turned my value proposition into a puzzle to solve. It became fun to make my own business model a case study to work on with them by my side. We found ways to trade on our skills that meant we all grew from every conversation and our businesses did too.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

We all grew up fitting ourselves into someone else’s job, becoming leaders on someone else’s path. Now we have this incredible opportunity to be leaders on our paths. We can not only grow a business, but grow as human beings at the same time. I feel fairly certain that it’s the way that we get to be the person that we were meant to be.

Very lucky those of us who even get that chance.

Matt- NicheWisdom.com @MattLevenhagen

I have always been attracted to running my own businesses because I LOVED the idea of ZERO limits to my income. When you work for yourself, there is no one there to build a ceiling for your income.

I also love the freedom it gives me in terms of time. I work when I want. I take breaks when I want. I can drop everything to go do something with my family and friends. I set my own hours… I don’t even use an alarm clock! I get up when I get up!

Matt is also founder of XtremeProfits.com a very profitable membership site where he teaches others how to succeed just as he has.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Being an entrepreneur can certainly have it’s good days and bad days. I believe a big difference between someone that gives up at some point and those that keep pushing forward, is having a clear VISION and PURPOSE for one’s life and business.

But not just a vague, wishy-washy vision and purpose.. you must want it badly enough!! You must hold something in your minds eye that you can get really enthusiastic about and passionate about.

AND for those that already are running a business full-time and have achieved.. but need to find the juice to keep the motor running, then comes down to envisioning what will happen IF you DON’T keep going; fearing it completely.

Like for me, if I fail to keep going, I have developed a picture of myself in my mind having to hunt for a job, work for someone else.. etc, etc.. and it’s ugly! Having to give up the lifestyle I’ve created for myself… THAT is what keeps me going; protecting what I worked so hard to gain.

And I think that is what motivates and keeps every successful entrepreneur and business person going.. the difference is vision and purpose.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I wasn’t sure in the beginning if it was truly possible that I could do this full-time, but I did make a little affiliate money right away so I knew there was potential…

…but my real mental roadblock was figuring out which thing to focus on. I remember in the beginning I tried a lot of stuff; I was scattered and trying to find the magic bullet.. chasing with the herd.

And one day finally realizing if I was going to make this work, I needed to FOCUS my energy at one thing. Once I did that and became a specialist, put everything else out of my mind, learned how to not get distracted, it all began to gel and I finally made what I needed to go full-time online and replace my offline income.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

Freedom is it for me too. Money’s, money.. right? You can make money at a lot of things. But you can’t make your own hours at a lot of things. Or get up when you want to, work when you want to, take a break when you want to, vacation when you want to…

I don’t have to drive anywhere and deal with traffic. I don’t have to deal with office politics, bump heads with co-workers or meet someone else’s deadlines.. or make someone else rich.

Waking up every morning being my own boss, doing my own thing and building it for ‘me’ and not someone else.. that’s a great dream to be living!

Darren- ProBlogger.net @ProBlogger

As my blogs have grown in popularity and have begun to generate income Blogging has grown from a hobby (some would say an obsession), to a part time job through to a fully fledged business in recent times. I have slowly built my blogging into a income source that has enabled me to dedicate more and more time to the medium to the point where I am currently a full time blogger – a ProBlogger.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

I’m not sure that this is ‘the’ answer – but for me one of the things that helps me keep on keeping on is simply doing something that matters.

In everything that I do I’m attempting to make the world a bit better both directly (for me its about helping my readers improve their lives by giving them good information) but also indirectly (one of my main motivations is to build a business that is profitable so that I’m able to use some of that income to help others). I find both of these things incredibly motivating and while there are tough times it is often these things that pull me through.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

One that I’m currently going through reaching my capacity. Until about a year ago I was able to keep things running in my business largely by myself. It was a juggling act at times but I was happy to be a bit of a one man band and things worked pretty well that way. However there came a time where I couldn’t keep things going alone.

I’ve experimented with a variety of ways of growing beyond myself (outsourcing, crowd-sourcing, contracting and employing) but to this point have not quite found the right mix… yet.

It’s partly a logistical roadblock but also partly mental – moving from a one person operation to a company with multiple people is something that can be hard to get your head around.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

It’s just who I am. Since I was a young boy I naturally was drawn to entrepreneurial activity. I was a regular on the doorsteps of my neighbours presenting them with opportunities to buy all manner of things, I spotted opportunities to sell different products to class mates and would lay in bed at night dreaming of the businesses I could start and grow.

So for me the best thing about this life I’m living is that it just feels right – it’s a fit, I enjoy it and love that I’m fortunate enough to be in a position to follow my dreams.

Glen- ViperChill.com @ViperChill

Clipped from: www.viperchill.com (share this clip)

Right now I’m travelling the globe and loving life while making a five-figure monthly income from my affiliate websites
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What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Have a clear focus for what you’re hoping to achieve and find people who managed to overcome the same struggles you’re currently facing. It was easy for me to stay motivated to make it on my own when all I had was a low-paying job and a college course I hated. Focus on what you’re trying to achieve, rather than the things you don’t like or aren’t working out.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I think the biggest mental block for me was to accept that this path simply won’t appeal to everyone. I think that when I started out, if I had someone close to me who was also trying to achieve success online, I would have made a lot more money, or at least been able to work for myself much earlier.

It was surprisingly hard to ignore my friends who advised me to stay in college and focus on getting a “real job” rather than continuing to follow my dreams. I’m glad I did ignore them though.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take.

For me I would agree with you: Freedom. I get to work the hours I want, on the days I want, and on projects I choose. It almost makes me feel like I’m bragging when I type that, but the feeling is amazing. Last month I had to work in an office for a day, and I absolutely hated it. It reminded me how fortunate I am and I was quite surprised at how difficult I found it.

Yaro- Entrepreneurs-Journey.com @YaroStarak

I operate my business from my home or on a Mac Air laptop while traveling. I’ve managed to generate over half a million dollars a year, with no full time staff, only contractors and myself working, traveled around the world, paid for my house and car, all thanks to my online business.
From www.entrepreneurs-journey.com (share this quote)

Yaro is also creator and owner of BlogMastermind.com, where he teaches how to be the best blogger you can be and find success online.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

The key is to keep focused on actions – some kind of action towards completing the most important task each day. I recommend you focus on celebrating each little success and try and get at least two hours of productive work done every day at the start of the day, before you check your email or browse the web.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

For me the biggest roadblock was belief in any outcome that I had yet to experience. One of the first goals I wanted to achieve, which to be honest felt like a pipe dream, was to make $1,000 a day. At the time I was struggling to make $500 a week, so it was a very far away goal. A few years ago I reached my goal. It came to me slowly without me realizing I had met it, but once I did I felt that I could really experience anything I put focused energy towards.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

The best thing is freedom of choice. I’ve never had a full time job in my life and avoiding the 9 to 5 has been the single most powerful motivation I’ve ever had to run a business. I love that I choose how my days go – which sometimes includes lots of work – but only ever on my terms. This includes traveling when I want to, for as long as I want, or staying at home and focusing on friends and family with a little work thrown in.

Lisa- OutSpokenMedia.com @LisaBarone

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Lisa Barone is Co-Founder and Chief Branding Officer of Outspoken Media, Inc. Lisa has been involved in the SEO community since 2006 and is widely known for her honest industry observations, her inability to not say exactly what she’s thinking, and her excessive on-the-clock Twittering…
From outspokenmedia.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.
Don’t listen to stupid people and remember why you started down this path.

As soon as things get hard, maybe even before they do, people are going to tell you that you’re crazy for staying with this “entrepreneur thing”. They’re going to tell you to hurry up and to get a job like everyone else. They’re going to try and “save you” by placing you back on a path of mediocrity. Don’t listen to these people.

They don’t know anything about you, your hunger, or what motivated you to begin with. They don’t know anything about creating their own future. As the super smart Naomi Dunford recently said, your loudest detractors are the ones with the most invested in the status quo. Who cares what they think? They’ve chosen to be average. You trust yourself and what you know you can do.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I think I’m right there with you. When you’re starting out it’s hard to accept that even though you work out of our house, in your pajamas, that you have a “real job”. And when you believe that (or…don’t believe it) it affects your business. You don’t take yourself seriously, you don’t take your work seriously and you almost feel guilty for being able to profit off your talents.

You don’t fully commit to what you’re doing because you’re waiting for the “sham” to be up and the day you’ll have to join the rest of the workforce. That was something I definitely struggled with when we first formed Outspoken Media. The idea that I had value, that I had a job, and that I could support myself doing solely this was something I had to learn to trust. But once you do trust that, you become really dangerous. The world opens up for you.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

The best thing for me has been the professional freedom. I’ve said this in interviews before, but as someone who spends her day blogging and interacting with people, it’s nice to be able to do that as Lisa and not worry about what a boss or supervisor may say about the conversations I choose to start.

I like to live on the edge of topics and sometimes that can get a little controversial for some people. I’m okay with that and I trust my audience to be okay with it too. For me, that’s created an authority and an ‘outspokenness’ that I never had professionally before.

Hesham- FamousBloggers.net @Hishaman

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I have a little knowledge about everything in life, I studied web design when I first entered the internet world, and bit by bit I decided to develop my skills, I turned to be a blogger when I realized the New Media revolution, and today a very high percentage of my income is depending on it.
From www.famousbloggers.net (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

Inside each one of us there is a complete world, my advice is to discover yourself before trying to discover what’s out there. I think entrepreneurs must know themselves, their inner powers and abilities, and what they really want, then the next steps are much  easier.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My simple one word answer to this would be Time. I see Time as a Big main challenge. In today’s market you can clearly see that Time beat Quality.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Personal freedom is one of the most driving reasons for living the entrepreneurial dream, I will add to this that in some cases -like mine- we are forced to leave our full time job behind, this happened when I had to move to another country, and to be honest, I am in love with my entrepreneurial life.

Sarah- SarahProut.com @SarahProut

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Always vibrant and curiously creative, Sarah’s unique approach to entrepreneurialism has paved a successful career in writing, online publishing and social media marketing. She is passionate about art, design, writing, metaphysics, Twitter and her two little darlings.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

The best advice I could offer is that you stay true to your vision as an entrepreneur. If you’re not loving what you’re doing then it might be time to move onto another idea. I’m a strong believer that our emotions are guiding the direction we should head in. If you’re feeling crummy about something then that’s a good indication to tweak the process a little bit somehow. And also, self-belief is a huge issue as an entrepreneur. The important thing to remember is to focus on what you love to do.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done.  I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

I still have mental roadblocks all the time! I think that’s just part of the natural creative process. There seems to always be a breakdown before a breakthrough. The biggest concern is consistency of income but somehow (through the magic of the Universe) it’s always fine and everything works out for the best. Try not to fuel concern or worry. Just pay attention to what you do want.

What is  the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)
Living the ‘entrepreneurial dream’ is about spending quality time with my children and enjoying the luxury to work at my own leisure. I love by the beach so it’s always nice to take a break away from the MacBook to watch the waves and meditate on creative possibilities. The best part of my work is the freedom. With freedom comes joy.

Corbett- ThinkTraffic.net @ThinkTraffic

Here’s what is so great about working in such a huge and democratic arena like the Internet. If you’re willing to study the right techniques and put in the necessary effort, you can get more than enough visitors to your blog or site to be successful online. You don’t have to wait to get lucky or ask for anyone’s permission.

Corbett also runs the wildly popular blog FreePursuits.com, where he talks about working for yourself and living the life you want.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

As an entrepreneur, longevity is something you should strive for. You have to commit to doing whatever it takes to succeed, but without committing to one single idea, or path or even business. Commit to yourself that you’re an entrepreneur for the long-haul, and realize that it might take years to build a successful business. That long-term view will help get you through the failures and road blocks along the way.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental obstacle in building a successful business was probably self doubt. Entrepreneurship is an emotional roller coaster. One day you’re on the cusp of ruling the world, and the next you’re days from becoming homeless. It isn’t really all that dramatic, but that’s what went on in my head. It took gaining some small successes before I could start to see the reality and feel more even. From there, success started building on itself.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

For me, the best part of being an entrepreneur is the fulfillment I get from doing what I love for a living and being solely responsible for my future. It’s an incomparable feeling.

Johnny- JohnnyBTruant.com @JohnnyBTruant

What I do doesn’t make sense. I don’t do internet marketing correctly at all, and my search engine stats are terrible. I don’t write about the things that make me money. I don’t have a big email list, and I don’t contact the list I do have often enough, or in the right way. I’ve never spent a dime on advertising. I swear too much and never, ever act “professional.”

And in nine months, I went from literally having never made a cent online to making five figures a month.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

You just have to do it. You just have to keep soldiering on in the face of adversity. There’s really no secret there, but the people who make it are those who keep going, even when they can’t see a light at the end of the tunnel.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Two things: First that there is just so much to learn. When you first start and you know nothing, you feel like a total idiot at times, but if you work hard enough and long enough, the results will come. Second, a weird thing happens with time when you’re on the Internet.

Often I’ll send an email in the morning and by the afternoon I’m wondering why the hell they haven’t answered me until I realize I haven’t really given them enough time to respond. Time moves at a different pace when you’re starting something new and you’re on your own. It seems like you’re working your ass off and not seeing any results. It takes faith until things start to happen.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

Totally agree. The best thing for me is freedom to do what I want, when I want, with the people I care about around me. It’s not about the money and material things, but it used to kind of be money when I first got started. I thought it would be awesome to have loads of cash, but when I went to a movie in the middle of the day with my wife and son when everyone else was at work, I realized it really was about the personal freedom that I have to do what I want, when I want.

John- JohnPaulAguiar.com @JohnAguiar

I am a Blogging Internet Entrepreneur that works with SEO, PPC and Social Media Marketing, Mentoring.

I’m also the #1 Uncle in the world! “That’s what my nephew says anyway”

From www.johnpaulaguiar.com (share this quote

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

I been through a few issues on my entrepreneur journey, both personal and business.

As far as personal, I think family and your health is priority, but at the same time, you need to continue on your journey to reach your goals with your business. During adversity, I think the best thing you can do is keep at it, work when you can, even if you only have 1 hour a day, make it the most productive hour you can.

For business adversity, I think the same applies, just keep working, the goal is to continue going forward each day even if it is small step. Once you stop working and moving forward, that’s when your business will suffer. For me my adversity came from not having the resources to do things I wanted in my business, so best thing you can do is rethink, find different ways to get results, read, learn. There are many ways to get the same results you want, you just have to rethink and take action and text.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

For me, it was information overload..having all this information, but not acting on it, afraid of failure. When I started my funds were low, so any new marketing or idea that took money made it hard to jump and take action, with fear of failing and losing that money.

I really don’t remember what or when I overcame this, but I know I read a lot, and when you read people telling you to take action enough, you start to take action lol.

You need to get your head to a point that says, I can fail from not trying, or I can maybe fail from taking action.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

I have to say freedom, the ability to do what I want when I want is something I wish more people felt. I had a Kidney Transplant in 2002.

Also when you’re an entrepreneur, you can work 60 hrs a week and not even blink or care, when you luv what you do, and you’re doing it for you, work isn’t work.

Another benefit that I never thought about, but have enjoyed, is all the other entrepreneurs I meet online every day, being able to talk to other people who are doing what I do and get it, is awesome.

TeeVee- TeeVeeAgguire.com @TeeVee2

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I hope my daughters read this and know that their father lived life to the fullest and made every effort to give them the world they deserved. I can’t wait to hear the stories they have yet to tell of their memories of today.

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

What has helped me is having a core group of friends that are also entrepreneurs and on the same journey as I am. I have family and friends that support me, but what has helped me the most are those folks that I can truly unload all my stuff on and they will understand my gibberish. I feel that they can truly relate to what I am going through and offer their suggestions to keep my head up and push through.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur? Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

My biggest mental block at the beginning (and to some extent now) is that I have anything of value that someone would pay me for. It was AHA came when I truly realized that I am an “expert” in several topics. Then realizing that someone would gladly pay me to pass along my expertise was mind blowing. I imagine that a lot of people that get into any type of business online have trouble accepting this idea because we are so accustomed to just showing up to work, punching in, and picking up a check. It was tough for me to accept this until I surrounded myself with others that were already doing this. In fact I was the only one that had a “real job”… so the peer pressure was intense.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

FREEDOM to live my life on my terms has to be the mostest bestest thing about my life now. I am doing all those things that I have always said I wanted to do. Boxing. Salsa dancing. Improv. Yoga. Take care of my body. Jump off a plane. Mentor. Love life and not curse waking up every morning because I had to go to work. To think that I can now give back to my community and give hope to those that see none is extremely gratifying. But the BIGGEST payoff for me in having my freedom has been that I now am able to be a better father.

Teevee also runs the show at VisuallyVerbal.com, BestEbookCoverDesign.com, and BuildAWebsite.MyV2M.com.  Whew… Teevee are you exhausted yet?!

Erika- RedHeadWriting.com @RedHeadWriting

I’m also rather talented when it comes to devouring jalapeño poppers and the random bag of Cool Ranch Doritos, can belt-out Janis Joplin’s “Mercedes Benz” a capella, and do (so I’m told) brilliant vocal impressions of both Golum/Smegel from Lord of the Rings and Bart Simpson (not from Lord of the Rings).
From www.redheadwriting.com (share this quote)

What is your best advice for soldiering on as an entrepreneur, in the face of mind-numbing adversity? (Personal or business adversity) I ask this one because I’ve been struggling with it a bit lately, and I’m certain many entrepreneurs do at some point.

If the adversity is mind-numbing, you need to ditch the source of the adversity. A numb mind isn’t productive for being your best self in business…or anywhere, really. I suggest getting a few “front stabbers” in your life – people who will tell you how it is, any time of the day or year and to your face. People you can trust. Lay it down for them and let them help you decide what you should pick back up and leave behind.

What is the biggest mental roadblock you had to overcome on your road to becoming a successful entrepreneur?  Mine was simply, that it can be done. I didn’t fully believe I could ever support myself without a “real job”, until suddenly I was.

Mine? That this is a j-o-b. I think Carol Roth says it best – if you have a “jobby” (a hobby disguised as a job), it ain’t a job. You need to treat yourself like a client, serve your self FIRST each day and do some serious legwork. Jonathan Fields talks about creating the avatar for your target demographic – who they are, their pain points, what they value. I add to that by saying you should ask yourself HOW you want to be unpopular. After all, if you’re serving everyone, you’re serving no one (an unpopular doesn’t mean unlikable). And then ask yourself about the four P’s: passion, pricing, process and profitability – four key elements you need to bring into any business.

What is the absolute best thing you can think of about living the “entrepreneurial dream”? For me it’s personal freedom, but I’d love to hear your take. :)

It’s simple: that I’m the one who built my business. My relationships. My achievements. Everything I have I earned and didn’t rely on a company to provide. I went out and got every piece of business – and once I had it, it was up to me to keep it. So it’s kind of a package. How I feel every day about owning my own business: you know how things are…wouldn’t you LIKE for them to be another way – one that makes you wake up every day jazzed to do it all again? That’s MY prize.

There you have it BGB’ers… straight from the horse’s yappers.  (Interviewees please forgive me for calling you a horse! ;) ) So how about you?  How do YOU handle personal and business adversity as an entrepreneur?  What are YOUR mental roadblocks?  What’s the best thing about being an entrepreneur to YOU?  Drop your thoughts in the comments below!  And if you’d like to download the PDF version of this post, feel free.  You can also distribute it to anyone you think would be inspired, but please don’t change it or republish any of the content without my permission.  ;)

Warmest

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{ 249 comments… read them below or add one }

DazzlinDonna September 14, 2010 at 3:23 PM

Thanks so much for including me in this incredible post. It may take me a while to read it all, but it’s obviously worth it. Great stuff!
DazzlinDonna recently posted..Ways To Make Money OnlineMy Profile

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admin September 14, 2010 at 7:53 PM

Hey Donna! That’s why I included the pdf, as I figured some folks might rather download and read it later. :) And yw, thanks so much for chipping in!

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Ruud Hein September 14, 2010 at 3:37 PM

RT @DonnaFontenot: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://t.co/5e8TrRD via @BigGirlBranding (long …

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Matt September 14, 2010 at 3:52 PM

Hey Cori,

Has someone told you how much you ROCK! lately? :D

Awesome post.. I am going to be reading ALL OF IT and recommending it to everyone; I’ve read several already and there’s some great insight and experience shared..

Thanks for all the hard work you put into this!!

-Matt Levenhagen
Matt recently posted..2nd Annual September Xtreme Madness Launched!My Profile

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admin September 14, 2010 at 7:55 PM

Thanks Matt! Yeah, it turned out to be a bit more work than I planned! LOL I had intended to add a personal paragraph or two on each interviewee on why I thought they are awesome, but I ended up unable to do that if I wanted to have it done to go out by today. 60 entrepreneurs!!!! I figured the answers alone would be awesome reading anyway. :)

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Nathan Hangen September 14, 2010 at 3:59 PM

Wow, this is one beefy blog post full of great entrepreneurial advice, via @biggirlbranding http://bit.ly/di37Rn

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Pat Flynn September 14, 2010 at 4:10 PM

WOW! This is probably the most ultimate post of the year! So much great advice! http://bit.ly/di37Rn via @biggirlbranding

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Rob Pene September 14, 2010 at 4:17 PM

OMG!!!!!!!

This is THE BEST post I’ve ever!!!!

Amazing!

Thanks for doing this!

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John Paul Aguiar September 14, 2010 at 4:26 PM

Cori.. that is one hell of a list haha Bloggers, Marketers, everything covered.

TY for including me.. I Appreciate it :)

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David Finch September 14, 2010 at 4:34 PM

RT @PatFlynn: WOW! This is probably the most ultimate post of the year! So much great advice! http://bit.ly/di37Rn via @biggirlbranding

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Pat September 14, 2010 at 4:42 PM

Wow! This is a SUPER read! Thank you for taking the time to create this, and again for including me along with these fantastic people.

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Thursday Bram September 14, 2010 at 5:00 PM

I'm proud to be included in this phenomenal post on entrepreneurial insight from 60 entrepreneurs by @BigGirlBranding http://bit.ly/cHtWKJ

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teevee September 14, 2010 at 5:02 PM

Thanks for including me in this AMAZING post with other incredible entrepreneurs. It is always an honor to call you my friend. :)
teevee recently posted..Thank You!My Profile

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marybabysteps September 14, 2010 at 5:04 PM

RT @thursdayb: IProud to be included in this post on entrepreneurial insight from 60 entrepreneurs by @BigGirlBranding http://bit.ly/cHtWKJ

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Eric September 14, 2010 at 5:05 PM

Cori, this post is AWESOME. To be honest, I’ve only read half of it so far, but I felt so compelled to leave a comment and commend you on an outstanding job putting this all together.

I will absolutely be saving the PDF for future reference. Thanks for sharing this with everyone.

- Eric

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admin September 14, 2010 at 7:57 PM

Hey Eric! Thanks, I appreciate the comment..so glad you’re enjoying it so far. It’s definitely got some killer advice all through it..and the funny thing is how similar in nature a lot of the responses were… makes you think there really is a sort of formula for success! :)

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Rob September 14, 2010 at 5:18 PM

Thanks for including me in this impressive list Cori! So much knowledge to soak up, hope to help you out again soon!

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admin September 14, 2010 at 7:58 PM

Hey Rob! So welcome, and thanks so much for contributing… it was awesome the way everyone stepped up to add their thoughts. :)

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Lisa Barone September 14, 2010 at 5:47 PM

Entrepreneurial advice from some super smart people…and then me http://is.gd/fazna

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James Chartrand September 14, 2010 at 6:44 PM

This is some serious advice. 60 entrepreneurs, phenomenal insight, all for you: http://bit.ly/9dsvhO

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Fabeku Fatunmise September 14, 2010 at 6:47 PM

RT @MenwithPens: This is some serious advice. 60 entrepreneurs, phenomenal insight, all for you: http://bit.ly/9dsvhO

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Tia Marie September 14, 2010 at 6:48 PM

RT @clp_ly Incredible article by @BigGirlBranding "Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, & Inspiration from Some of the Best" http://clp.ly/11hAP

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Molly Gordon, Self-Employment Coach September 14, 2010 at 7:10 PM

Be true to yourself. Chunk things down into do-able bits. Take action every day. Get support. This collection is a powerful reminder that the simple things are the most effective–and that they are not always easy.

Side note: I really appreciate the diversity of the voices you brought to this project.

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admin September 14, 2010 at 8:01 PM

Thanks Molly! I tried to include a blend of the ‘big’ guys, and also entrepreneurs who might not be as big, but are making things happen successfully regardless. Glad that showed! And yep, it’s usually the simplest things that are often most effective.

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Francisco Rosales September 14, 2010 at 7:25 PM

Hey Cori, this must be the longest post ever. Half way through I was thinking “hmm… she didn’t include me”.

But seriously, great piece that needs to be read a couple of times, bookmarked and shared. Thanks for putting it together and also for making me part of it.

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admin September 14, 2010 at 8:04 PM

LMAO!!! No, of course I included you! I included everyone I asked! At least I hope I did..LOL 60 folks, it started to get tough to keep track of! But that’s why I figured a PDF would be useful, since it’s so long. And I didn’t want to break it into a series, because that wouldn’t have been any fun. :)

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Mars Dorian September 14, 2010 at 7:28 PM

wow – what a huuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuge post.
I will read through all of, although in PDF form, lol.

Nice epic work Cori – you ROCK !
Mars Dorian recently posted..Become a World Famous Brand – 5 Sweet-Ass Lessons from Final FantasyMy Profile

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admin September 14, 2010 at 8:05 PM

Thanks Mars! Hope you enjoy it, there is some really excellent advice throughout.. I’m honored so many folks contributed, and such great insight!

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Stanford September 14, 2010 at 7:31 PM

Hey luv :)
This post made my day. Can’t wait to dig in and meet all of the awesome rockstart listed. Feeling like a millionaire with all the free wisdom.

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admin September 14, 2010 at 8:06 PM

Hey hun! So glad to hear it! :D It’s definitely a boatload of wisdom! And thanks so much for being a part of it!

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Srinivas Rao September 14, 2010 at 7:41 PM

Cori,
Thanks so much for including me in this. I’m honored to be among such great company. Also, I’m really excited to check out all these new people I haven’t heard and get them on BlogcastFM as guests :). Every time somebody puts one of these lists together my first instinct is to look for people I can interview.

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admin September 14, 2010 at 8:07 PM

Hey hun! You’re very welcome, thanks so much for contributing! :D Definitely some great candidates for BlogFm, no doubt!

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JadedTLC September 14, 2010 at 7:41 PM
Dave Navarro September 14, 2010 at 7:53 PM

RT @MarsDorian: RT @BigGirlBranding: Epic post that features several AWESOME entrepreneurs http://bit.ly/b2l5uR

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Molly Gordon September 14, 2010 at 8:08 PM

Amazing how much their views converge: 60 entrepreneurs: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and… http://fb.me/HJTAs7Tq

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Lawton Chiles September 14, 2010 at 8:13 PM

RT @MenwithPens: This is some serious advice. 60 entrepreneurs, phenomenal insight, all for you: http://bit.ly/9dsvhO

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John Paul Aguiar September 14, 2010 at 8:45 PM

TY to Cori For Including Me..RT @BigGirlBranding Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://ow.ly/2E523

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Danielle LaPorte September 14, 2010 at 8:51 PM

this is EPIC! and! USEFUL. killer combo. bravo and thank you.
xo

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:41 AM

Yw Danielle! Thank YOU for contributing… all the interviewees helped make it epic! :D

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Sharon Hurley Hall September 14, 2010 at 9:14 PM

RT @MenwithPens This is some serious advice. 60 entrepreneurs, phenomenal insight, all for you: http://bit.ly/9dsvhO -> worth a read

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Tia September 14, 2010 at 10:25 PM

Holy Cow that is a massive list! :) I’m honored to be part of it, and especially to be among some of the greats. How cool is that?

Great job, girl. I know it took you forever but it will pay off big time for you. And now this is an epic post – exactly what I was just talking about in my latest post on Stickiness Factor. Very cool!

Cheers,
Tia

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:43 AM

I KNOW! LOL I had no idea it was going to get so massive, but in the end I said eff it..lol Massive it is! :D And so happy you participated, I was honored so many kick ass entrepreneurs stepped up to contribute their thoughts.

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Erica Douglass September 14, 2010 at 10:50 PM

RT @BigGirlBranding: 40 Top Entrepreneurs Share Their Successes, Fears & Struggles: http://ow.ly/2Ec90

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Sarah Mitchell September 14, 2010 at 10:56 PM

Congrats! RT @jadecraven: Honored 2 B featured: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://bit.ly/c6ixjE

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Hesham September 14, 2010 at 11:37 PM

What a great chance to get to know some new bloggers, I a honored to be included in your list Cori, this is really great post, I am imagining all the hard work you put on it!

The PDF format is a great idea, it’s a nice source of information!

Many thanks dear!

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:45 AM

Hey hun! Yep it was lots of hard work, lol.. a bit more than I expected, but well worth it.. I love all the entrepreneurs that contributed to make it great. :D

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Hesham September 14, 2010 at 11:42 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best — Big Girl Branding http://t.co/O986vo9 via @BigGirlBranding

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Hesham September 14, 2010 at 11:42 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best — Big Girl Branding http://t.co/O986vo9 via @BigGirlBranding

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Jean Sarauer September 14, 2010 at 11:49 PM

Cori, what a beautiful resource you’ve put together! As a reader, I deeply appreciate your time and effort. As a bloggerpreneur, I thank you for including me with this inspiring group of folks . There is so much wisdom in this compilation. Hmm, guess that’s probably why you called it ‘entrepreneurial wisdom,’ eh? I’m a quick learner :)
Jean Sarauer recently posted..Four Critical Components to Your Blog’s SuccessMy Profile

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:46 AM

Hey Jean! Thanks so much my luv.. it was quite a bit of effort, but so well worth it! And yw, I figured who better to learn from than a bloggerpreneur such as yourself? :) I learn from you all the time! So see..both quick learners! ;)

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John Anyasor September 14, 2010 at 11:53 PM

Hey Cori! It was honor to be apart of this (especially when I’m releasing my first product this month).

A ton of great wisdom here. Thanks for being the mastermind behind it all :)

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:46 AM

YW John! Great luck with the product launch, I’m sure it will do great! :) I appreciate you being willing to participate!

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Sarah Prout September 14, 2010 at 11:55 PM

This is an amazing and inspiring post! Thank you so much for including me. Love Sarah x

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:47 AM

You’re welcome Sarah! Thanks so much for adding to the mix, I know I hit you up pretty short notice! lol Xo

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Tia Marie September 14, 2010 at 7:03 PM

Incredible article Cori! Thank you for putting the hard work into this article and sharing it with us!

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admin September 14, 2010 at 7:59 PM

You’re very welcome Tia! So glad you’re enjoying in.. I didn’t realize it would go live before I got home today! LOL I thought 1500 was 3pm EDT.. apparently not quite. :D

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SARAH PROUT September 15, 2010 at 12:07 AM

Check out this awesome post: http://tinyurl.com/25xp7fo – Soooo many amazing entrepreneurs featured!

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SARAH PROUT September 15, 2010 at 12:08 AM

@BigGirlBranding you are a star Cori! Thanks so much for this awesome post: http://tinyurl.com/25xp7fo

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Kristi Hines September 15, 2010 at 12:09 AM

RT @BigGirlBranding Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://ow.ly/2Ec90

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Maryline September 15, 2010 at 12:36 AM

Hey Cori! Wow, impressive post! Nice job!

Thanks for including me and… Oh no wait, I stole that line, I’m not one of those :)
I wish I was, but for now? I’m just a casual blogger. But I so very much enjoy reading you and those 21st century fairy tales!

Congrats!
Maryline recently posted..Two Rules to Blog BetterMy Profile

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:49 AM

Thanks so much Maryline! :D Mayhap in a future edition, you never know what I’ve got cookin’!

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Catherine Caine September 14, 2010 at 8:55 PM

WOW. What a stunning resource, well done!

(And thank you for making me look MUCH more important than I am. :) )

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:42 AM

YW hun! And you ARE important… you’re an entrepreneur doing great things with yourself, that’s stuff to be proud of and tell the world! :)

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Hendra September 15, 2010 at 2:21 AM

Great post Cori!
Two thumbs up for interviewing the masters of online biz!
Downloading the PDF report now :D

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:42 PM

Thanks Hendra! Might want to re-download though… :-/ I’m a dork and totally forgot to include an interview..by none other than Problogger himself! Ugg.. lol I feel like a dunce!

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Yanik Silver September 15, 2010 at 2:46 AM

Quick insights on entrepreneurship from some names you might not see everywhere – http://tinyurl.com/25xp7fo

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Adam Baker September 15, 2010 at 2:58 AM

RT @DanielleLaPorte: An EPIC piece on Entrepreneurial Wisdom from @BigGirlBranding http://su.pr/6oOJ0i

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Richard "Manxman" Killey September 15, 2010 at 3:06 AM

Awesome PDF. Thanks Cori.

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:43 PM

YW Richard! Might want to re-download though.. included another interview that I’m a dork and somehow missed. :-/

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Ana September 15, 2010 at 4:55 AM

Cori, you do know you made it absolutely impossible for anyone to make any constructive comment on your incredible post!

Wow doesn’t even begin to describe the wealth of advice you manage to drag out of so many bloggers :).

I love it and thanks so much for honoring me with the inclusion.

Ana Hoffman
http://www.TrafficGenerationCafe.com
Ana recently posted..How To Conquer Your BLOG Low Subscription Rate Once And For AllMy Profile

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:46 PM

Thanks Ana! And thanks so much for contributing! :) I can’t believe I forgot an interview though, I feel like such a goof today. Might want to re-download the PDF if you did that before, it’s got an additional interview with Darren Rowse. lol

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Jennifer September 15, 2010 at 12:18 AM

Awesome compilation! It was really great reading everyone else’s responses – so much inspiration that I’ll definitely have to refer back to it! Great idea to include the PDF. Hats off to you girl for putting together something so great. I really appreciate you including me in the project and I feel honored to be among such an impressive list of entrepreneurs.

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admin September 15, 2010 at 12:48 AM

Thanks so much Jennifer! So glad you enjoyed it! :D I know it’s rather long, but so worth the read! Perfect morning coffee inspiration. :) I appreciate YOU for contributing!

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Kenny Rose September 15, 2010 at 1:19 AM

For 30 years I have been involved in business in one form or the other. I have worked with business advisor’s and entrepreneurs in the public and private sector from large companies to one man/woman micro enterprises. I am absolutely telling anyone who has the time to read these comments. Download this pdf and analyse every word AND apply even 20% of this advice and your business will be successful. Great post. Thanks for the hard work you put in and for sharing for free. :)

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:41 PM

Thanks so much Kenny! And you’re very welcome, glad you found so much value in it. :) That was my goal!

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Larry Clark September 15, 2010 at 9:01 AM

Really great post and thanks for the pdf too! I feel like I just stole from you. You could charge $ for this post. seriously. great stuff and things to learn from. One thing though is I would like to know what YOUR adversity was.
Thanks Again!!!

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:48 PM

Hey Larry! Thanks so much! I’d recommend re-downloading the PDF, I just updated it and the blog post to include an interview I totally missed. (How I have NO idea!!!). As to my adversities, mayhap I’ll save those for another post. :)

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Larry Clark October 11, 2010 at 9:03 PM

This post gave me a great idea for another post I am doing right now. I hope you’re doing well and look for a pingback. And thanks AGAIN! Great Content!!!

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admin October 12, 2010 at 2:11 AM

Hey Larry! Nice, glad I could give you a boost of inspiration! :) I look forward to the post you produce!

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Jonny Gibaud September 15, 2010 at 9:09 AM

Ok, that was a truly epic post, my eyes were literally bleeding towards the end. I also have a list to the floor of new blogs to check out with has completely ruin my productivity today and so because of that I say “Thank you and I hate you”

P.S I’m kidding, I don’t really hate you. Great site.

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:49 PM

LOL..thanks Jonny… I don’t hate you either. ;) Just updated with a new interview, so be sure to check back. The whole thing was a ton of fun, but man… lots of work! lol

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Ann Smarty September 15, 2010 at 10:35 AM

Whew! I am in a good company! RT @BigGirlBranding: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from the Best http://bit.ly/djg1hd

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Chris Garrett September 15, 2010 at 11:50 AM

This is a fantastic post, congratulations on pulling it together :)

It’s so deep I must stop reading now and get some work done.

Keep up the great work Cori :)

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:53 PM

Thanks Chris! And thanks so much for participating. I was so excited at all the great responses I received. :D But can you believe I forgot to include Darren’s interview? He was the very first interviewee, and he’s been so great to me with guest blogging, and letting me harass him.

But I didn’t label his interview in my mail, and by the time I was done, I was cross-eyed and praying I didn’t miss anyone, going through all the emails! Then I wake up this morning to the realization I’m a total dork and DID miss someone… and didn’t add Darren’s interview. UGGG…

So it’s updated now, PDF as well for all reading pleasure. :) But get some work done first, you can come back to it later. ;)

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Annabel Candy, Get In the Hot Spot September 15, 2010 at 11:55 AM

Wow! Cori, I’m honored to be part of something so Mammoth and gob-smacked that you managed to put this together. Thank you so much for including me with all these amazing people. This blog post is phenomenal. Off to tell the world about it now:)

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:55 PM

Thanks Annabel, the honor was mine! :D Be sure to download the updated PDF if you went that route… had to add an interview. lol There’s an edit that tells the whole story. :-/ So glad you loved it!

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Abby Kerr September 15, 2010 at 12:27 PM

So much awesomeness packed into this. Thank you for the time you devoted to creating this post. And thanks for tapping my brain alongside all these wonderful peers and mentors. This was fun!

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:56 PM

Ty Abby! :D It was fun for me too… all this wisdom and experience… it’s something I have a feeling I myself will be referring back to often! lol

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Jorgen Sundberg September 15, 2010 at 12:50 PM

Great work, well done Cori! And big thanks for giving me the chance to participate in this! All the best, Jorgen

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admin September 15, 2010 at 1:56 PM

Thanks so much Jorgen! So glad to have you participate, it was a blast! :)

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Julie September 15, 2010 at 4:48 PM

Great article! I am a follower of Ana Hoffman’s “Traffic Generation Cafe”, and will be checking out many of the other great sites listed here. Great information – thanks for sharing!

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admin September 16, 2010 at 12:56 AM

Thx so much Julie! And you’re very welcome so glad you’re enjoying it!

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Marios September 15, 2010 at 6:28 PM

Hello, I don’t even know what to say, this is insane, so amazing Thank you for this great post, some of those bloggers I read regularly, some are new to me but will check them out. Its great to know what inspires other blogger to do what they do and why they do it,

Thank you

Marios
Marios recently posted..Best Social Places to Get Quality BacklinksMy Profile

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admin September 16, 2010 at 12:57 AM

Aww thanks Marios.. :) So glad you’re enjoying it, it is great to see what motivates others on similar paths.. makes one feel not quite so alone. :)

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Jazz Salinger September 15, 2010 at 9:52 PM

Hi Cori,

This is an awesome post. Thanks for making it available as a download. It’s something I’ll want to read over and over again.

I loved reading everyone’s answers. It really makes you feel less alone when you realize that everyone struggles with the same stuff.

Thanks for the ray of hope.

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admin September 16, 2010 at 12:57 AM

Hey Jazz! You’re very welcome, and I totally agree!

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Heather C Stephens September 16, 2010 at 12:35 AM

Hi Cori,

I’ve taken the time to read, absorb, and take to heart each and every word and I see some major trends. They’re not really a surprise to me, but obviously very powerful commonalities for entrepreneurs, and great reminders for all of us to remember. Because when we’re growing a business and growing ourselves we’re bound to struggle with mind-numbing adversity and mental road blocks from time to time!

Here’s are a few of the golden nuggets I’ve taken away from your post:
1. Don’t quit…stay the course
2. Assess what you’re doing and make sure you’re doing the things you’re passionate about and are good at
3. Surround yourself with people who are on the same journey you are for support and encouragement.
4. Build a team of people who make up for your weaknesses
5. Believe in yourself and know you have more to offer than you think you do
6. Have a vision and a bigger purpose than just making money
7. Work really, really, really, really hard and take action every day on your business…even if you can only do one thing
8. Listen to people who are successful, tune out those who aren’t
9. Know your why and stay focused on who you can help with your information/work
10. Have faith, conviction, and above all perseverance

I cannot even begin to tell you how meaningful this post is to me. I’m sure you’re changing the lives of a lot of people with this content, and the ripples you are making will go on for miles!

Thank you…I can tell how much work and effort went into creating this post! You did an amazing job!

Heather
Heather C Stephens recently posted..Network Marketing Leadership- Seth Godin on Tribes and Creating a MovementMy Profile

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admin September 16, 2010 at 1:00 AM

Hey Heather! You totally nailed all the parallels I was finding! LOL I found it so funny putting it together how similar all the answers were and how similar all the mindsets were. And thanks so much for your awesome comment… THAT means a ton to me, that it’s made an impact on you and your life. :)

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Alan September 16, 2010 at 4:25 AM

Cori,

Thanks so much for this great information!

I became aware of your site from following Ana Hoffman’s “Traffic Generation Cafe” blog and her post. This is really good information and a PDF that I will likely read over and over for the encouraging words and great information that is found in it. After all who doesn’t struggle sometimes with life and business.

Thanks so much for the great information you provide.

Regards,
Alan

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admin September 16, 2010 at 4:37 AM

Thanks so much Alan! So glad you’re enjoying it, I appreciate you dropping by! :)

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cr0cus September 16, 2010 at 5:53 AM

Hi Cori! I’ll be coming back repeatedly to the entries in this post to ponder on their wisdom… it’s too much for me to take in one sitting.
When I finally have a product to promote…I’ll know where to turn to.

Thanks for sharing….

c”,)

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admin September 17, 2010 at 2:14 PM

Hey hun! Thanks so much, glad you enjoyed! :)

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Adrian Swinscoe September 16, 2010 at 10:09 AM

Hi Cori,
This is an amazing post with an incredible set of insights. Thank you so much for putting it together and sharing so many insights from a wide range of bloggers and entrepreneurs.

I think one of my biggest blocks that I had to get over and it is the same thing with a number of my clients is that I can do it and people will want to hear what I have to say and want what I have to give. However, another is getting over the idea that not everyone needs to like what I have to say or give to make me successful.

Best wishes,

Adrian
Adrian Swinscoe recently posted..Improve customer service by getting back to basicsMy Profile

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admin September 17, 2010 at 2:16 PM

Hey Adrian! Yw, so glad you enjoyed it. :) I agree, the mindset of thinking people actually want to hear what you have to say is tough.. but agreed again, it’s not about everyone so everyone doesn’t have to like it. It’s about the people that resonate and are attracted to you and what you do that matter.. you’re “right people” as Abby likes to say! :D

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TPEntrepreneur September 16, 2010 at 6:26 PM

Big shout out to @BigGirlBranding – Thanks for the highlight http://bit.ly/9Ja4Dv

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David Risley September 17, 2010 at 2:35 PM

"Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best …" – http://bit.ly/c6ixjE via @BigGirlBranding

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David Risley September 17, 2010 at 2:35 PM

"Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best …" – http://bit.ly/c6ixjE via @BigGirlBranding

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Sean Dailey September 17, 2010 at 2:36 PM

RT @BigGirlBranding: #FF @soniasimone @nhangen @RedSlice @rowdykittens @BizChickBlogs @WillieCrawford for kick ass contributions to http://su.pr/6oOJ0i Ty again!

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Erin September 17, 2010 at 4:56 PM

I haven’t read this yet, but you’ve JUST made my day..no month! I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE this kind of stuff. Can’t wait to dig in and provide you an awesome comment in response to all of your hard work. WOW!

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admin September 18, 2010 at 2:07 PM

Hey Erin! Yay! So glad you’re excited to read it, it’s really awesome stuff. Hope you enjoy and learn LOTS.

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Hesham September 17, 2010 at 6:27 PM

RT @BigGirlBranding: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best ##BGB ##blogging http://bit.ly/djg1hd

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SARAH PROUT September 17, 2010 at 11:35 PM

RT @BigGirlBranding: #FF @viperchill @LisaBarone @hishaman @sarahprout @thinktraffic @johnnybtruant @JohnAguiar 4 killer contributions to http://su.pr/6oOJ0i Woo

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SARAH PROUT September 17, 2010 at 11:35 PM

RT @BigGirlBranding: #FF @viperchill @LisaBarone @hishaman @sarahprout @thinktraffic @johnnybtruant @JohnAguiar 4 killer contributions to http://su.pr/6oOJ0i Woo

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JamestheJust on Elance September 18, 2010 at 3:19 AM

Cori –

That, Cori, was a mad dose of inspiring whip-it-good. I can’t answer your questions just yet – can’t say I’m doing a great job of it all at the moment – but the # of times I read “work your keister off” at least I got one thing down.

I needed the post – I have now downloaded the PDF. Thanks!

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admin September 18, 2010 at 2:16 PM

Hey James! So glad you found value in it. :) I’d recommend reading it regularly! lol We all have high and low points, so I think this post was a great example that they don’t have to be a insurmountable road block.

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eileen ludwig September 18, 2010 at 4:27 AM

This was awesome. Read all but the last 10. Did not get any work done today except this. This is a great boost for anyone. The confidence needed is in the answers. So many people said the pain of the corporate world or cubicles was a motivator and the freedom of not having to live or work in that environment was terrific to hear. People were so honest and so uncorporate which was so refreshing.

I pulled out some of the things people said an put it in a email as inspiration. Put some as my status in Facebook with ….. personsname

This took a lot of work on your part and those who answered. I thought you said problogger was added as update. I will look at the pdf.

Thank you so much for doing this and including so many people from so many different business or blogs.

Eileen Ludwig

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admin September 18, 2010 at 2:17 PM

Hey Eileen! Yep Problogger’s in there now, mayhap one of the 10 you missed as yet. :) And SOO glad you found inspiration in it..I’d say if you can print out the PDF and make it something you read regularly when you need some pep or motivation.

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louise September 19, 2010 at 8:11 AM

Some excellent inspiration here, just hope I get time to read it all. Well it’s Sunday morning, so a little time off just reading won’t hurt, or is that still working? – who cares – it’s all the same now, I love it!

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admin September 20, 2010 at 5:15 PM

LOL.. yes, reading on Sunday should be required..work and/or play! And thanks so much, so glad you’ve enjoyed it Louise!

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Kevin Strawbridge September 20, 2010 at 1:22 AM

The threads that run through this are so true – do it; stay focused; be passionate.

Thanks for sharing.

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admin September 20, 2010 at 5:15 PM

Thx Kevin! So glad you’ve enjoyed it! :) Funny how that works isn’t it?

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RedheadWriting September 20, 2010 at 2:31 PM

Honored to be included (I'm at the bottom!) | Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3

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Michelle Mangen September 20, 2010 at 2:38 PM

Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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【ツ】Ron Callari September 20, 2010 at 2:39 PM

Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Lara Galloway September 20, 2010 at 2:40 PM

Great list! > Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Shelly Kramer September 20, 2010 at 3:39 PM

Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Diana Adams September 20, 2010 at 3:44 PM

RT @ShellyKramer: Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Jonathan Fields September 20, 2010 at 3:47 PM

Killer resource – Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight & Inspiration by @biggirlbranding http://ow.ly/2GVnT via @ShellyKramer

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Carla Young September 20, 2010 at 4:25 PM

Great list! > Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ow.ly/2GWjl (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Carla Young September 20, 2010 at 4:25 PM

Great list! > Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ow.ly/2GWjl (featuring @RedheadWriting)

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Leah Segedie September 20, 2010 at 7:34 PM

Great list! > Entrepreneurial Insight & Wisdom by @biggirlbranding http://ht.ly/2GRv3 (featuring @RedheadWriting )

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Erroin Martin September 20, 2010 at 3:59 PM

Cori,

Thanks for the wonderful review of entrepreneurs and for providing the PDF. Posts like this help those of us out there on the front lines stay focused and upbeat!

Yours,

@Erroin

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admin September 20, 2010 at 5:16 PM

You’re welcome Erroin! So glad I could help motivate and inspire you by putting this together. :)

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Hech September 20, 2010 at 11:27 PM

Hi Cori
I’ve read the 1st 6 and realized its something I would want to read again. But I cant seem to use your download tool. Its keeps going into scribed and wont let me make a pdf download. please if you can, email it to me.

Many thanks
Regars
Hech

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admin September 21, 2010 at 4:21 AM

Hey Hech! Hmmnn.. It won’t let you right click and save as? Weird, I’ll have to look into it. I’ll definitely send you the PDF version, I’ll try to send it tomorrow afternoon when I get back in the office. :)

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Erin Hill September 20, 2010 at 9:23 PM

Reading this again and burning it into my memory RT @BigGirlBranding: Entrepreneurial Wisdom from the best :http://bit.ly/di37Rn #dbbb

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mark_hayward September 21, 2010 at 1:13 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best – http://bit.ly/c6ixjE massive post from @BigGirlBranding.

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Angel September 21, 2010 at 8:07 PM

Hi,

Thanks for this inspiring article and for providing the PDF. Publications like always give me power and motivation for my future initiatives.

Regards,
Angel

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admin September 23, 2010 at 1:23 AM

Yw Angel, so glad you enjoyed!

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Kathy Meyer September 21, 2010 at 8:30 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight & Inspiration by @biggirlbranding http://ow.ly/2GYXd via @ShellyKramer @jonathanfields *Gr8!

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Kathy Meyer September 21, 2010 at 9:04 PM

Ur so welcome! A true 'masterpiece' of a post! ;D @FightJobs: Another GREAT read, thank you!! http://ow.ly/2GYXd by @biggirlbranding

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Satya - Fierce Wisdom September 24, 2010 at 9:51 PM

This is INSANE, the amount of work you put into this. Love how this is flying. Cheers!

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admin September 24, 2010 at 10:09 PM

Thanks so much Satya! So glad you’re enjoying it, that was the goal! Nice blog you’ve got btw…I’ll make some time to poke around and do some more reading this weekend if I can… I love your passion from the bits that I read! :)

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Ali Hale September 27, 2010 at 6:45 PM

Epic post (including ME!) – "Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration" – http://t.co/IbkA1KP from @BigGirlBranding

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Mars Dorian September 27, 2010 at 9:12 PM

RT @alihale: Epic post (including ME!) – "Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration" – http://t.co/IbkA1KP from @BigGirlBranding

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Ben Lang September 29, 2010 at 5:42 PM

All I could Cori is wow. I enjoyed this post so much, I could tell how much work you put into it.. Thanks so much for doing that.

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admin September 29, 2010 at 6:52 PM

Aw thanks Ben! So glad you enjoyed it, it was quite a bit of work. :) But well worth it!

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George Williams September 30, 2010 at 10:41 PM

RT @yaniksilver Quick insights on entrepreneurship from some names you might not see everywhere – http://tinyurl.com/25xp7fo

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Alex Sysoef October 1, 2010 at 5:26 PM

This is an incredible collection of blogs Cori, and I’m sure quite a bit of work went into it.

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admin October 1, 2010 at 5:46 PM

Hey Alex! Good to see you here! :) Yes, it’s a great collection, and was quite a bit of work. But WELL worth it! :D

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Electrical generators October 2, 2010 at 8:39 AM

Thanks for this inspiring report and for delivering the PDF. Publications like constantly give me strength and motivation for my future initiatives.

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Francisco Rosales October 3, 2010 at 1:35 AM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best [by @BigGirlBranding] http://ow.ly/2Nwoe

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John August 5, 2011 at 11:00 AM

I like Yaniks answer here – “It’s about the process not the profits” at the beginning.
Its so true especially when you have to start over after learning the hard way!

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admin September 15, 2011 at 12:52 PM

Ditto! I’ve learned a few hard lessons, and it’s definitely always an eye opener and another step in the right direction.

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Janet Stewart October 3, 2010 at 2:21 AM

RT @socialmouths: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best [by @BigGirlBranding] http://ow.ly/2Nwoe

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Tony October 3, 2010 at 2:22 PM

Wow, is all I have to say. This post is a project in itself. I’m blown away by the time ad energy it must have taken to compile all of this insight and inspiration into one post. Kudos – I hope you take this blog as far as it will go.

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admin October 7, 2010 at 9:32 PM

Thanks Tony, so glad you enjoyed the post… I recommend referring back often! :)

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Andrew October 6, 2010 at 7:03 AM

Wow!! This is all worth the effort. A really valuable post. And surely, one should take blogging one step at a time.

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admin October 7, 2010 at 9:25 PM

Agreed.. one step at a time with everything in my book! lol

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Andy October 8, 2010 at 2:57 AM

Yes, personal freedom. It was also hard for me to stack up and be a slave of the 8hours working shift and sometimes, even more. I love the freedom I have now and at the same time, I was also earning money.

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Thu Nguyen October 20, 2010 at 3:15 PM

Hi Cori,

I’ve mentioned this on Twitter but thank you for this epic post. I’m a new commentator however, not a stranger to your work. At this point, I’m questioning my own voice in blogging as that is my platform to work on however, from a entrepreneurial perspective, I don’t know what moves.

I’m having obstacles which I’m pondering as well. Good thing you have made yours open and have gone on and did the inevitable by asking everybody in the blogging planet how they overcame their’s.

So I’m going to download your PDF because I rather have a copy for my own and see how I can apply experiences by individuals whom I also respect and look up.

I hope everything is going great for you at the moment. :)

Appreciate the awesome share!

Cheers!
Thu

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admin October 21, 2010 at 7:25 PM

Hi Thu! You’re so welcome, I’m glad you’re finding value in it! :) It’s a great resource to help you gain some perspective on your own personal issues, it’s always nice to know you’re not the only one that goes through hard times! I look forward to seeing you around here more often and hopefully you get a lot out of the BGB community.

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Charlie October 23, 2010 at 6:37 AM

That’s great read! And yes I agree that it is always and the best relief when you know that you are not alone in experiencing tough times.

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admin October 23, 2010 at 10:47 PM

Very true Charlie, thanks for dropping by!

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Dennis Edell October 24, 2010 at 9:37 AM

I’m not gonna lie to ya, or make something up, but tell ya straight out…..I’m not even attempting a read here; downloaded! LOL

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admin October 25, 2010 at 8:53 AM

LOL.. thanks Dennis..I hope you enjoy it!

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Akintunde Akinola October 25, 2010 at 11:12 PM

Originally I set out to find out how Godaddy.com search engine visibility works with blog’s only to discover a Q/A section, http://community.godaddy.com/godaddy/61-top-bloggers-shed-light-on-how-they-made-it-big/
Even thou it was outside of my search I run across this beneficial material that apply to beginners like myself. I must admit the article and your site encourage me to think big and stay the course. I don’t know you but…

Thanks!

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admin October 27, 2010 at 11:20 AM

Hey Akintunde! :) So glad you found us! And you’re very welcome, so glad you enjoyed the piece. Be sure to download the PDf and save it, I recommend referring back often!

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Amy Spreeman November 1, 2010 at 1:32 PM

These are some terrific insights. You’ve given me a lot to think about. The one thing I continuously struggle with is this one: “My biggest mental road block was that I had to do it all… because I think no one can do it better than me. ”
Sigh. Still working on that one.

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admin November 1, 2010 at 10:09 PM

Thanks Amy! :D So glad you found the post valuable. Keep working on that one for sure… I promise there are people out there you CAN count on to do it just as good, and even at times better than you. It just takes a bit of time and effort to find them sometimes. :)

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Steven Aitchison November 1, 2010 at 3:47 PM

Wow! RT @BigGirlBranding: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best bloggers http://bit.ly/a1vXyu

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Natalie Sisson January 4, 2011 at 2:37 PM

@catherinecaine love your responses 4 @biggirlbranding post http://ht.ly/3xZbO I too love feedback and comments to keep me going. Happy NY

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Michael Stewart March 7, 2011 at 5:50 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best | Jericho Technology | http://ht.ly/49skE

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ashwin shahapurkar March 27, 2011 at 4:37 AM

really inspiring, enjoyed reading each ones story.

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admin March 27, 2011 at 2:02 PM

Thanks Ashwin, glad you enjoyed! :)

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Maria Pavel April 9, 2011 at 12:59 PM

Excelent advice regarding at least one activity each day. Not necessarily for the business, but for the businessman. Once you skip work one day, that only deepens the rift and you’ll find yourself skipping again next week. Then in a month or two you’ll skip two days, then three, and eventually one of two things will happen: you’ll lose interest, or you’ll lose your business.
Maria Pavel recently posted..CNA Training in ConnecticutMy Profile

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admin April 20, 2011 at 12:58 PM

Hey Maria! It’s definitely a trap you want to avoid at all costs.. slacking for a day always leads to more unintentional slacking.. I know this from my own experiences! lol

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Samantha April 18, 2011 at 8:06 PM

“No matter how small, just make sure you don’t go to bed without one thing that can make tomorrow bigger than today.”

- Having a business is a continuous process. You need to offer something new to your customers/clients in order to make something different for them. Though you can expect a recurring headache too from time to time, at least you can get some benefit from it in the long run.

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admin April 20, 2011 at 1:11 PM

Hey Samantha.. very true it is a continuous process. And it definitely doesn’t always run itself! :)

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Ayden May 1, 2011 at 3:33 AM

Damn Cori what a post. What inspiration. I’ve never heard of the Toilet paper entrepreneur… lol

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admin May 1, 2011 at 2:50 PM

Mike rocks, you should check him out. He’s very funny and such an all around nice guy. Always willing to communicate with his readers as well. He’s awesome. :)

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James T. Bledsoe May 3, 2011 at 4:17 AM

This is a very nice compilation of inspirational tips those who overcame the trials of starting. I must say that one of the best I ever saw! You really took time to provide valuable articles from the best. I just downloaded your PDF for a reference. Thanks to you, this will help me align to the goals that I want to achieve.

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admin May 18, 2011 at 11:08 PM

You’re welcome James!

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Delena Silverfox May 6, 2011 at 4:40 AM

Wow, you’re absolutely right! This post is jam-packed full of awesomeness and I can see how the PDF would be a good idea for the ones who just can’t wait to get their hands on it all at once. I think I like getting it in pieces like this, though. It’s easier to digest.

Delena
Delena Silverfox recently posted..epc LisburnMy Profile

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admin May 18, 2011 at 11:07 PM

Thanks Delena.. you just gave me an idea as another way to re-purpose that report! lol

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Wez Bailey May 19, 2011 at 3:46 PM

The biggest problem that I had-and still have unfortunately-is that I cannot outsource my work, even the most trivial ones. I have to do EVERY single thing and I have to admit that it takes a lot of my time, if only I could trust someone with the mundane and routine tasks and concentrate on the most important ones.

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admin May 24, 2011 at 9:30 AM

Hey Wez.. It can be tough to let go of the reins, but I’d recommend working harder at trying it. Start small, with something that won’t cause death or maiming if it gets screwed up. As your confidence and trust builds, expand to other tasks. :)

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Joshua May 24, 2011 at 8:14 AM

Even the best needs to improve, else he’ll be left out, and for those who think they know it all, there is a lesson that you haven’t even heard of the infinite that is yet to be learnt by you!
Joshua recently posted..Why Choose Plumbing as a CareerMy Profile

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admin May 24, 2011 at 9:35 AM

Very true.. never stop learning or you’ve stopped growing and progressing.

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Joshua May 28, 2011 at 12:28 AM

Yes it is like that. The moment you stop, you are left behind. Remember the epic tale where the hare lost to a tortoise because he had thought that he had advanced pretty much and hence needed to rest. True life is also like that.
Joshua recently posted..Plumbing Practice TestMy Profile

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admin June 8, 2011 at 12:57 PM

Exactly! lol Good reminder. :)

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Olivia Unise June 18, 2011 at 11:58 PM

It is always good to remember when going through hard times that one day it does get better.

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admin June 19, 2011 at 9:22 AM

Very true Olivia!

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Aman July 7, 2011 at 8:38 AM

So true Olivia, when the going gets tough, the tough get going as they say. :)

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Jean-Luc July 29, 2011 at 4:26 PM

wow awesome post, it might the longest one I’ve ever read
I like Chris words, when he says remember why, and help people
thanx for sharing

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admin September 14, 2011 at 1:20 PM

Thx Jean-Luc, glad you enjoyed!

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Devenir Riche August 9, 2011 at 5:28 PM

Economic crisis can be good when it forces individuals to create their own wealth
nice long post ^^

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admin September 15, 2011 at 1:59 PM

Lol.. thanks. :) it’s a longy but a goody. Glad you enjoyed.

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Ana August 24, 2011 at 1:42 PM

Great, now I am jealous… and unloved… and forgotten… LOL

Just kidding!

LOVED all the insight – you have a neck for putting together posts like these, Cory.

Ana
Ana recently posted..Blog Titles: How to Write Winners Even if You Suck at ItMy Profile

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admin September 15, 2011 at 2:35 PM

Oh you are NOT! Actually I think we had not connected yet when I put this post out, otherwise you’d have totally been on my list of interviewees! :D The next one I do you’re 100 percent in if you want to be. :) xo, glad you enjoyed!

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Tim Ryan September 3, 2011 at 3:59 AM

Very inspiring indeed Cori! So helpful for those aspiring entrepreneurs. I can’t imagine how you compiled all these but thanks for your effort. Would definitely share this to anyone I know can benefit from it. More power!
Tim Ryan recently posted..Seller Tips: 10 Things You Can Do To Prepare Your Home To SellMy Profile

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admin September 15, 2011 at 2:44 PM

Took awhile! LOL

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Kelli October 17, 2011 at 2:38 AM

I would like to hear from someone who has gone back into the corporate 9-5 after trying the entre thing. I bet its tough.
Kelli recently posted..5 Keys To Help You Get Traffic from TwitterMy Profile

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admin November 11, 2011 at 2:39 PM

Oh I have no doubt it’s tough. I couldn’t imagine going back myself!

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Scott October 17, 2011 at 2:40 AM

Wow! What a great post! sooo much info!

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Dane November 16, 2011 at 5:59 AM

I really got inspired by some quotes of successful entrepreneurs.
Thanks for sharing this post, now I know where to focus on!

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Agatha November 28, 2011 at 6:36 PM

Awesomeness! A great resource and much thanks for taking the time to gather all this info into one handy place. Cheers!

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Rose Calis December 1, 2011 at 2:01 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://t.co/e7GOw25i

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Leo Widrich December 7, 2011 at 7:43 PM

Amazing post: Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://t.co/9blDHg3l by @BigGirlBranding

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conference gifts December 19, 2011 at 8:54 AM

Hi to all the staff of biggirlbranding! Sincce you decided the article to be downloaded in a pdf format because of its huge content, you can count on me that I will read it and finished it today. Thanks for preparing this article. I am new to entrepreneurship and i hope that i can succeed in it. Advance Happy New Year and more power to biggirlbranding.com

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admin December 20, 2011 at 1:32 PM

Thanks Cathy, hope you enjoy!

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Jure KLEPIC December 19, 2011 at 7:31 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best http://t.co/mbQpAH0h via @ThinkDevGrow

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Terrence Polley December 22, 2011 at 4:54 AM

I tell what you did was awesome! It made my day! Not only did you compiled the best, their inspiring words certainly made an impact on me. I also would like to thank you for the PDF that you did (yeah I downloaded it). I just hope you keep on posting this kinds still. The internet is a very open knowledgebase which you can use to learn many things, however, most of the time it can really be confusing. This post is really a great help for newbies like me.

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manchester community December 24, 2011 at 4:19 PM

I recently came across your blog and have been reading posts. I thought I would leave a comment. I don’t know what to say except that I have enjoyed reading. Nice blog. I will keep visiting this blog very often.

Wishing you a Great Christmas and a Prosperous New Year

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admin December 26, 2011 at 3:30 PM

LOL.. thanks!

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Stan B December 27, 2011 at 2:35 PM

Excellent post! It’s encouraging to see that most of the successful online entrepreneurs were once in a similar situation as you are now in and had similar mental roadblocks as you do. Reading this made me feel more confident about my choices. Thanks!

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Matt Kinsella January 11, 2012 at 12:17 PM

Haven’t been able to read it all yet but what I have read so far is brilliant. I started my adult life in a teenage homeless hostel and turned my life around to become a successful entrepreneur and it has been tough at times but it’s worth it, keep pushing forward and you will get there in the end.
Matt Kinsella recently posted..What Do You Want In Life?My Profile

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admin January 12, 2012 at 1:09 AM

Thanks. Sounds like you have quite the story yourself. If you’d ever care to share it on BGB, let me know. :)

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Stacy January 12, 2012 at 4:46 AM

You’ve managed to gather lots of quality information. Thanks for sharing and for your patience.
Stacy recently posted..LG WM3360HVCA Front Load Washer ReviewMy Profile

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Pete January 20, 2012 at 11:51 AM

These quotes are incredibly motivating. As a law office gopger, i rarely have any time to myself, and having my little time filled with positive messages keeps me going.. thanks!

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admin January 27, 2012 at 8:40 AM

Yw Pete!

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Hip Hop Website January 25, 2012 at 2:12 PM

This is one of the longest and most informative blog posts I have ever read. Wow. How long did it take you to come up with this? Christ. The favorite thing I read was the part about using social media to network with others. I currently use twitter, youtube, myspace and facebook to network and it’s awesome!

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admin January 27, 2012 at 8:29 AM

Took a bit of time! :) But well worth it.

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Dan Lew February 9, 2012 at 6:37 PM

These entrepreneurs really inspired me a lot, especially Yanik Silver. I’ve known him for so long and even interviewed him on my own, and publish it through my own blog. Because of them, I am truly motivated to become one of them someday. :)

Dan Lew

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Avatar February 16, 2012 at 12:02 AM

“I found that the most important thing that allowed to overcome the shock and the despair was that I didn’t look back. I decided not to dwell on my inner stories of regret, blame, and self-doubt.”
This is so cool. You are a good fighter. Blaming of others of one’s suffering is not really an intelligent person. It doesn’t gonna help with the current sitaution . But rather puts you in a deeper state of moroseness, anxieties and stress and wont be happy and peace of mind from this. Find a way how can you be out from the situation so you wont be entangled. If theres will, there’s a way.
Thanks for such a very long and informative article. Excellent!!!

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henry February 20, 2012 at 2:41 PM

brilliant blog, yes i agree we should all take blogging one step at a time.i really appreciate the time and energy it must have taken to do this, your enthusiasm shines through!

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Tony March 13, 2012 at 5:04 AM

Hey Cori! It took me 15 minutes to read your article carefully. :) Great job! Thanks for sharing!

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admin March 20, 2012 at 12:24 PM

LOL.. Thanks Tony, glad you enjoyed. It’s definitely more of a sit down with a cup ‘o Joe type read. :)

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Gelgarin March 22, 2012 at 2:25 PM

Holy moly; that just kept on going. A fantastic read, and I truly applaud the amount of time and effort that must have gone into its creation. The PDF option is great, something I wish more sites offered, it’s so much more readable a format.

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Shallie Bey March 23, 2012 at 5:00 PM

Entrepreneurial Wisdom, Insight, and Inspiration from Some of the Best — Cori Padgett is Big Girl Branding http://t.co/JgGeYXB7

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Zoe April 12, 2012 at 4:03 AM

Cori, this is the monster of all posts, I was wondering what I’d let myself in for but the further I got in, the more intrigued I was by the various comments left. I can see why it took so long to compile but credit where credit due! I could relate to so many of your interviewees’ comments but most to Pat’s comments (sorry that’s Pat Flynn of course!) when there is doubt following the excitement of going it alone and yes I work tons more hours than I did in corporate life, but I know I am the one who will get the financial rewards on this journey and quality time around my family! We are new and it is tough! Great reading!

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admin April 23, 2012 at 9:41 PM

Hey Zoe! Glad you found the read useful, mission accomplished. :) We are new and it is tough… amen to that. LOL

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Steven Papas April 14, 2012 at 10:23 AM

Oh my goodness that was by far the longest blogpost I have ever had the grace to skim. I thought it was going to end but it just kept going and going and going.

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admin April 23, 2012 at 9:39 PM

LOL. Well you know… I like to keep readers on their toes. ;)

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Dee April 17, 2012 at 9:54 AM

Wow!

My favorite part of this post is that there are TONS of blogs/people I’ve never heard of.

Bookmarking this page for quiet reading since I’m supposed to be working right now! LOL

dee :)

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admin April 23, 2012 at 9:35 PM

Lol.. thanks Dee! Hope you learn something useful. :)

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maria April 26, 2012 at 9:55 AM

wow! this is aawesome, i was put off by the length of this blog at first but thecontent is awesome…well done you!

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admin May 1, 2012 at 2:17 PM

Thanks Maria!

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Jim Antoine May 9, 2012 at 3:53 AM

Wow! What a great list!
I actually managed to read about 4 individuals but I am surely coming back. Truly inspiring! Thank you!

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eliza June 2, 2012 at 11:10 AM

love the bit where it says i quote “if the adversity is mind-numbing, you need to ditch the source of the adversity.” true true words, so simple yet so good a solution

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admin June 7, 2012 at 8:15 PM

Couldn’t agree more Pete! :)

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Elena Anne September 11, 2012 at 4:47 PM

Wow, what a wealth of information. Your questions really prompted some insightful answers from these successful people. So many excellent points made, I’ll have to bookmark this page and come back often for inspiration!

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Paul November 28, 2012 at 7:19 AM

I agree with Eliza on the quote “ditch the source of the adversity”. Someone I knew a while back coined the phrase “you need a life laundry” and the sentiment is true. If anything gets in the way then firstly you need to identify why and what’s the motive (just to make sure the objection is not valid). Then and only then can you be certain it’s time to get the laundry on but what a carthatic event it becomes! 8-)

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admin November 28, 2012 at 12:06 PM

True dat Paul. :)

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Dylan Tanaka January 1, 2013 at 11:27 PM

What an a** kicking post. I’ve been a full time entrepreneur for close to 10 years, a blogger for 7, and marketing online for 5. The snippets from your entrepreneurs were spot on. I can definitely vouch for the sentiments of both Yanik and Rob Granholm.

You’ve definitely got a new hungry subscriber in me!

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admin January 7, 2013 at 1:03 PM

Hehe thanks Dylan! So glad you enjoyed the read. It’s definitely a keeper to refer back to when you’re needing a boost! :)

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Jessica March 20, 2013 at 9:40 PM

It was really helpful that you are sharing this details to your readers, I do personally having a worth while in the article. Thanks for sharing such good release.

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Paul Lee April 3, 2013 at 6:21 PM

I just bookmarked at least half of the sites you listed here. Nothing like a little wisdom all of us can surely benefit from, thanks!

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Cori April 3, 2013 at 10:20 PM

Hehe… glad you liked it Paul! :)

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